Sony Patent | Mix tape digital assets in virtual environments

Sony Patent | Mix tape digital assets in virtual environments

Patent: Mix tape digital assets in virtual environments

Drawings: Click to check drawins

Publication Number: 20210365526

Publication Date: 20211125

Applicant: Sony

Abstract

Managing access to digital content in a virtual environment using virtual content rights, including: providing a virtual content rights database comprising data associating a user of the virtual environment with the virtual content rights acquired with respect to the digital content; receiving a request from a device of the user for assignment of the virtual content rights of the digital content, wherein the user uses the device to interface with the processor; updating the virtual content rights database to indicate the assignment of the virtual content rights to the user; receiving data from the device of the user holding the virtual content rights to digital content including songs to create a virtual mix tape having at least one of the songs; and updating the virtual content rights database to indicate sharing of the virtual mix tape by the user within the virtual environment.

Claims

  1. A method for managing access to digital content in a virtual environment using virtual content rights, the method comprising: providing a virtual content rights database comprising data associating a user of the virtual environment with the virtual content rights acquired with respect to the digital content; receiving, at a processor, a request from a device of the user for assignment of the virtual content rights of the digital content, wherein the user uses the device to interface with the processor; updating the virtual content rights database to indicate the assignment of the virtual content rights to the user; receiving, at the processor, data from the device of the user holding the virtual content rights to digital content including songs to create a virtual mix tape having at least one of the songs; and updating the virtual content rights database to indicate sharing of the virtual mix tape by the user within the virtual environment.

  2. The method of claim 1, wherein sharing of the virtual mix tape comprises at least one of transferring, lending, renting, selling, copying, and combining the virtual mix tape.

  3. The method of claim 1, wherein sharing of the virtual mix tape comprises at least one of displaying and playing for others in the virtual environment.

  4. The method of claim 1, further comprising receiving, at the processor, a request to buy a blank virtual mix tape.

  5. The method of claim 4, further comprising receiving, at the processor, a request to copy the virtual mix tape having the at least one of the songs to the blank virtual mix tape to produce a second-generation virtual mix tape.

  6. The method of claim 5, further comprising sending permission to the user device that the user is now free to sell, trade, or give away the second-generation virtual mix tape to other users within the virtual environment.

  7. The method of claim 1, wherein the virtual content rights for the digital contents are held by other users and the songs included in the virtual mix tape are owned by the other users.

  8. The method of claim 7, further comprising deducting a set amount from an account of the user in a user account database for the use of the songs included in the virtual mix tape owned by the other users.

  9. The method of claim 1, wherein the digital content included in the virtual mix tape further includes at least one of videos, audios, photos, and other media items to personalize the sharing of the virtual mix tape.

  10. The method of claim 1, wherein the virtual mix tape includes at least one of artworks, logos, writings, and other items to personalize the sharing of the virtual mix tape.

  11. The method of claim 1, further comprising adding a set amount to an account of the user in a user account database for the use of the digital content by other users, wherein the user holds the virtual content rights to the digital content.

  12. The method of claim 1, further comprising receiving, at the processor, a request from a device of the user to add songs of other users to the virtual mix tape of the user by trading access to the songs owned by the user, wherein the other users hold the virtual content rights to the songs to be added.

  13. A system for managing access to digital content in a virtual environment using virtual content rights, the system comprising: a virtual content rights database comprising data associating a user of the virtual environment with the virtual content rights acquired with respect to the digital content; a processor to receive a request from a device of the user for assignment of the virtual content rights of the digital content, wherein the user uses the device to interface with the processor, wherein the virtual content rights database is updated to indicate the assignment of the virtual content rights to the user, the processor to receive data from the device of the user holding the virtual content rights to digital content including songs to create a virtual mix tape having at least one of the songs, wherein the virtual content rights database is updated to indicate sharing of the virtual mix tape by the user within the virtual environment.

  14. The system of claim 13, wherein the processor receives a request to copy the virtual mix tape having the at least one of the songs to a blank virtual mix tape to produce a second-generation virtual mix tape.

  15. The system of claim 14, wherein the processor sends permission to the user device that the user is now free to sell, trade, or give away the second-generation virtual mix tape to other users within the virtual environment.

  16. The system of claim 13, further comprising a user account database including an account of the user to deduct a set amount from the account for the use of the songs included in the virtual mix tape owned by other users.

  17. The system of claim 13, further comprising a user account database including an account of the user to add a set amount to an account of the user for the use of the digital content by other users, wherein the user holds the virtual content rights to the digital content.

  18. The system of claim 13, wherein the digital content included in the virtual mix tape further includes at least one of videos, audios, photos, and other media items to personalize the virtual mix tape.

  19. The system of claim 13, wherein the virtual mix tape includes at least one of artworks, logos, writings, and other items to personalize the virtual mix tape.

  20. A non-transitory computer-readable storage medium storing a computer program to manage access to digital content in a virtual environment using virtual content rights, the computer program comprising executable instructions that cause a computer to: provide a virtual content rights database comprising data associating a user of the virtual environment with the virtual content rights acquired with respect to the digital content; receive a request from a device of the user for assignment of the virtual content rights of the digital content, wherein the user uses the device to interface with the processor; update the virtual content rights database to indicate the assignment of the virtual content rights to the user; receive data from the device of the user holding the virtual content rights to digital content including songs to create a virtual mix tape having at least one of the songs; and update the virtual content rights database to indicate sharing of the virtual mix tape by the user within the virtual environment.

Description

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims the benefits of priority under 35 U.S.C. .sctn. 119(e) of co-pending U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 63/027,794, filed May 20, 2020, entitled “Mix Tapes in Virtual Reality Environment” and U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 63/044,709, filed Jun. 26, 2020, entitled “Virtual Content Management.” The disclosures of the above-referenced applications are incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND

Field

[0002] The present disclosure relates to creating, owning, transferring, and/or managing music-related digital assets, and more specifically, to creating, owning, transferring, and/or managing one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) in a virtual environment.

Background

[0003] Currently, users can create, play, or transfer playlists of songs and/or music videos. However, playing or transferring a playlist of songs and/or music videos fails to provide meaningful interactions or relationships among users and between users and virtual environments.

SUMMARY

[0004] The present disclosure provides for creating, owning, transferring, and/or managing one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) in a virtual environment.

[0005] In one implementation, a method for managing access to music-related digital content in a virtual environment using virtual content rights is disclosed. The method includes: providing a virtual content rights database comprising data associating a user of the virtual environment with the virtual content rights acquired with respect to the music-related digital content; receiving, at a processor, a request from a device of the user for assignment of the virtual content rights of the music-related digital content, wherein the user uses the device to interface with the processor; updating the virtual content rights database to indicate the assignment of the virtual content rights to the user; receiving, at the processor, data from the device of the user holding the virtual content rights to music-related digital content including songs and/or music videos to create one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) having at least one of the songs and/or music videos; and updating the virtual content rights database to indicate sharing of the one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) by the user within the virtual environment.

[0006] In another implementation, a system for managing access to music-related digital content in a virtual environment using virtual content rights is disclosed. The system includes: a virtual content rights database comprising data associating a user of the virtual environment with the virtual content rights acquired with respect to the music-related digital content; a processor to receive a request from a device of the user for assignment of the virtual content rights of the music-related digital content, wherein the user uses the device to interface with the processor, wherein the virtual content rights database is updated to indicate the assignment of the virtual content rights to the user, the processor to receive data from the device of the user holding the virtual content rights to music-related digital content including songs and/or music videos to create one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) having at least one of the songs and/or music videos, wherein the virtual content rights database is updated to indicate sharing of the one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) by the user within the virtual environment.

[0007] In another implementation, a non-transitory computer-readable storage medium storing a computer program to manage access to music-related digital content in a virtual environment using virtual content rights is disclosed. The computer program includes executable instructions that cause a computer to: provide a virtual content rights database comprising data associating a user of the virtual environment with the virtual content rights acquired with respect to the music-related digital content; receive a request from a device of the user for assignment of the virtual content rights of the music-related digital content, wherein the user uses the device to interface with the processor; update the virtual content rights database to indicate the assignment of the virtual content rights to the user; receive data from the device of the user holding the virtual content rights to music-related digital content including songs and/or music videos to create one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) having at least one of the songs and/or music videos; and update the virtual content rights database to indicate sharing of the one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) by the user within the virtual environment.

[0008] Other features and advantages should be apparent from the present description which illustrates, by way of example, aspects of the disclosure.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0009] The details of the present disclosure, both as to its structure and operation, may be gleaned in part by study of the appended drawings, in which like reference numerals refer to like parts, and in which:

[0010] FIG. 1 is a flow diagram of a method for managing access to music-related digital content in a virtual environment using virtual content rights in accordance with one implementation of the present disclosure;

[0011] FIG. 2 is a block diagram of a system for managing access to music-related digital content in a virtual environment using virtual content rights;

[0012] FIG. 3A is a representation of a computer system and a user in accordance with an implementation of the present disclosure;

[0013] FIG. 3B is a functional block diagram illustrating the computer system hosting the music-related digital content access management application in accordance with an implementation of the present disclosure.

[0014] FIG. 4 shows generation “0” (GEN0) and generation “1” (GEN1) music-related digital assets;

[0015] FIG. 5 shows Generation “2” (GEN2) music-related digital assets;

[0016] FIG. 6 shows Generation “3” (GEN3) music-related digital asset;

[0017] FIG. 7 shows an overview of steps involved with a user request to a platform administrator server;

[0018] FIG. 8 illustrates step (710) of FIG. 7;

[0019] FIG. 9 illustrates step (720) of FIG. 7;

[0020] FIG. 10 illustrates step (730) of FIG. 7;

[0021] FIG. 11 illustrates step (740) of FIG. 7;

[0022] FIG. 12 illustrates step (750) of FIG. 7;

[0023] FIG. 13 illustrates step (760) of FIG. 7;

[0024] FIG. 14 illustrates step (770) of FIG. 7; and

[0025] FIG. 15 shows an overview of steps involved with a platform administrator request.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0026] As described above, playing or transferring a playlist of songs and/or music videos fails to provide meaningful interactions or relationships among users, and/or between users and virtual environment.

[0027] Certain implementations of the present disclosure include: creating music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) which are content aggregations represented as unique virtual environment objects; sharing the music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) including, among others, transferring, lending, renting, selling, copying, and combining the music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets); and exposing music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) including displaying, playing for others in virtual environment areas, and discovery through music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) relationships. After reading the above descriptions, it will become apparent how to implement the disclosure in various implementations and applications. Although various implementations of the present disclosure will be described herein, it is understood that these implementations are presented by way of example only, and not limitation. As such, the detailed description of various implementations should not be construed to limit the scope or breadth of the present disclosure.

[0028] In one implementation, a virtual environment provides users with virtual objects. Further, the users can interact in the virtual environment visually (e.g., observing objects, writings, and visual art) and aurally (speech, sounds). That is, the users can see and interact with objects in the environment.

[0029] In one implementation, the users can create music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes or analogous music-related digital assets). To create an original music-related digital asset (such as a mix tape or analogous music-related digital assets), a user selects one or more songs and/or music videos (in whole or in part), arranges them in an order if need be, selects a name and appearance of the music-related digital asset, and creates a music-related digital asset (such as a mix tape or analogous music-related digital asset) object according to the selections. To create a derived music-related digital asset (such as a mix tape or analogous music-related digital asset), the user selects at least one item in another music-related digital asset (such as another mix tape or analogous music-related digital asset) and adds zero or more additional items, original selections, or other digital items from other music-related digital assets.

[0030] In other implementations, the users can perform the following with the music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets): display the music-related digital assets objects in locations, such as virtual or physically real housing, shops, libraries, or publish them for others to see; play the music-related digital assets for other users to be heard by specific users or by location/proximity (e.g., playing a music-related digital asset in a user housing so that all users in the housing can hear the music); inspect and access the music-related digital assets of other users, according to access settings; and/or share the music-related digital assets with other users, such as displaying, playing for others in virtual or physically real environment areas, and discovery through the music-related digital asset’s relationship to the virtual or real physical environment. In one implementation, the system can provide music discovery by identifying common aspects of playlists, music-related digital assets, particular songs and/or music videos, and environments.

[0031] In one implementation, a user holding the virtual content rights to selected songs and/or music videos creates the music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) including the selected songs and/or music videos by buying blank virtual media (e.g., represented by virtual tapes or other media) from a virtual environment store and recording the music-related digital assets to the blank virtual media. In other implementations, the user can also add songs and/or music videos of other users (holding the virtual content rights to the songs and/or music videos being added) to the user’s own music-related digital asset by trading access to the user’s own music-related digital assets for access to the music-related digital assets of the other users.

[0032] Once a music-related digital asset (such as a mix tape or analogous music-related digital asset) having a plurality of songs and/or music videos is completed, the owner of the music-related digital asset can replicate the music-related digital asset by copying the contents (e.g., songs and/or music videos, videos, and other media contents) to another piece or blank virtual media to produce a second copy. The owner is now free to sell, trade, or give away the replicated music-related digital asset to others within the virtual environment.

[0033] In the above music-related digital asset context, the following alternative implementations are possible. In one implementation, a user buys or creates artwork to add to the music-related digital asset (e.g., on the cover or anywhere on the outside of the music-related digital asset), and possibly copying the artwork to other music-related digital assets. In another implementation, a user is able to copy the music-related digital assets of other users freely, for a fee, or upon completion of a task requested or required by the virtual environment administrator or the creator of the music-related digital asset. In another implementation, the number of virtual song and/or music video rights is limited to a capped amount for each user to avoid content rights hoarding, or the number is set by the seniority of the user within the virtual environment (e.g., more advanced users have more capacity to hold rights to more songs and/or music videos). In another implementation, derivative, second generational music-related digital assets are created algorithmically or manually by combining the contents of two separate music-related digital assets. In another implementation, the provenance or record of the history of content rights ownership is included within the music-related digital asset (e.g., showing both current and past content rights holders who may be contacted within the virtual environment).

[0034] In another implementation, the virtual content rights held by a user may be lost if the rights are not exercised often enough by using the content asset within the virtual environment. This is similar to the “use it or lose it” concept in which the user either exercises the virtual content rights by using the content asset (e.g., sharing, listening to, making music-related digital assets (such as mix tape), etc.) or loses the virtual content rights. For example, in a game environment, this concept would make the user keep coming back to the game to keep the virtual content rights. In another implementation, the virtual content rights to one content asset are shared by multiple users within the virtual environment. In another implementation, the user simultaneously controls multiple content rights or a select few at a time. In this implementation, the number of content rights controlled by the user may be tied to the status level of the user, with the higher status conferring more advanced or more numerous virtual content rights. In another implementation, the user is rewarded more (with virtual rewards, points, status, etc.) when the user’s content asset (i.e., the song to which the user holds the virtual content rights) is copied on music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) or listened to more within the virtual environment. In another yet implementation, to copy a music-related digital asset in the virtual environment, the user copying the music-related digital asset is required to travel to an area of the virtual environment to affect a copying event (e.g., the user seeking to make a copy of a mix tape needs to touch the blank virtual media to the mix tape to copy the artwork and/or the content asset properties).

[0035] FIG. 1 is a flow diagram of a method 100 for managing access to music-related digital content in a virtual environment using virtual content rights in accordance with one implementation of the present disclosure. In the illustrated implementation of FIG. 1, a virtual content rights database is provided, at block 110, wherein the database includes data associating a user of the virtual environment with the virtual content rights acquired with respect to the music-related digital content.

[0036] A request is received, at block 120, from a device of the user for assignment of the virtual content rights of the music-related digital content. In one implementation, the request is received at the processor and the user uses the device to interface with the processor. The virtual content rights database is then updated, at block 130, to indicate the assignment of the virtual content rights to the user. At block 140, data is received, at the processor, from the device of the user holding the virtual content rights to music-related digital content including songs and/or music videos to create a one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) having at least one of the songs and/or music videos as the case may be. The virtual content rights database is then updated, at block 150, to indicate sharing of the one or more music-related digital assets by the user within the virtual environment. In one implementation, sharing of the one or more music-related digital assets includes at least one of transferring, lending, renting, selling, copying, and combining the one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets). In one implementation, sharing of the one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) includes at least one of displaying and playing for others in the virtual environment.

[0037] In one implementation, the method further includes receiving, at the processor, a request to buy a blank piece of virtual media or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets). In one implementation, the method further includes receiving, at the processor, a request to copy the one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) having the at least one of the songs and/or music videos to the blank one or more music-related digital assets to produce a second generation one or more music-related digital assets. In one implementation, the method further includes sending permission to the user device that the user is now free to sell, trade, or give away the second generation one or more music-related digital assets to other users within the virtual environment. In one implementation, the virtual content rights for the music-related digital contents are held by other users and the songs and/or music videos included in the one or more music-related digital assets are owned by the other users. In one implementation, the method further includes deducting a set amount from an account of the user in a user account database for the use of the songs and/or music videos included in the one or more music-related digital assets owned by the other users. In one implementation, the music-related digital content included in the one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) further includes at least one of videos, audios, photos, and other media items to personalize the sharing of the one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets). In one implementation, the one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) includes at least one of artworks, logos, writings, and other items to personalize the sharing of the one or more music-related digital assets. In one implementation, the method further includes adding a set amount to an account of the user in a user account database for the use of the music-related digital content by other users, wherein the user holds the virtual content rights to the music-related digital content. In one implementation, the method further includes receiving, at the processor, a request from a device of the user to add songs and/or music videos of other users to the one or more music-related digital assets of the user by trading access to the songs and/or music videos owned by the user, wherein the other users hold the virtual content rights to the songs and/or music videos to be added.

[0038] FIG. 2 is a block diagram of a system 200 for managing access to music-related digital content in a virtual environment using virtual content rights in accordance with one implementation of the present disclosure. The system 200 includes a processor 220, a virtual content rights database 230, and a user account database 240.

[0039] In the illustrated implementation of FIG. 2, the virtual content rights database 230 includes data associating a user of the virtual environment with the virtual content rights acquired with respect to the music-related digital content. The processor 220 receives a request from a device of the user for assignment of the virtual content rights of the music-related digital content. The user uses the device to interface with the processor. The virtual content rights database is updated to indicate the assignment of the virtual content rights to the user. The processor 220 also receives data from the device of the user holding the virtual content rights to music-related digital content including songs and/or music videos to create a one or more music-related digital assets having at least one of the songs and/or music videos. The virtual content rights database 230 is then updated to indicate sharing of the one or more music-related digital assets by the user within the virtual environment.

[0040] In one implementation, the processor 220 receives a request to copy the one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) having at least one of the songs and/or music videos copied to one or more blank music-related digital assets to produce a second generation of one or more music-related digital assets. In one implementation, the processor 220 sends permission to the user device that the user is now free to sell, trade, or give away the second generation one or more music-related digital assets to other users within the virtual environment. In one implementation, the system further includes a user account database 240 including an account of the user to deduct a set amount from the account for the use of the songs and/or music videos included in the one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) owned by other users. In one implementation, the system further includes a user account database 240 including an account of the user to add a set amount to an account of the user for the use of the music-related digital content by other users, wherein the user holds the virtual content rights to the music-related digital content. In one implementation, the music-related digital content included in the one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) further includes at least one of videos, audios, photos, and other media items to personalize the one or more music-related digital assets. In one implementation, the one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) includes at least one of artworks, logos, writings, and other items to personalize the one or more music-related digital assets.

[0041] In one implementation, the system 200 shown in FIG. 2 is a computer system that can support numerous mix tape creation, publication, sharing, and exchanging functions located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated: (1) the computer system to support the creation of music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) exchanges and Walkman type device for playback and social enablement; (2) the computer system to support the creation of music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) to be placed within the virtual environment world to be found by other users; (3) the computer system to support the creation of mix tape playback on the user’s virtual mobile phone; (4) the computer system to support the creation of virtual environment world created music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) that are placed within the real physical world as geo-located music-related digital assets to be found by others (user or non-users using a mobile companion application or analogous).

[0042] In one implementation, the system 200 is a system configured entirely with hardware including one or more digital signal processors (DSPs), general purpose microprocessors, application specific integrated circuits (ASICs), field programmable gate/logic arrays (FPGAs), or other equivalent integrated or discrete logic circuitry. In another implementation, the system 200 is configured with a combination of hardware and software.

[0043] FIG. 3A is a representation of a computer system 300 and a user 302 in accordance with an implementation of the present disclosure. The user 302 uses the computer system 300 to implement a music-related digital content access management application 390 as illustrated and described with respect to the method 100 and the system 200 in FIGS. 1 and 2.

[0044] The computer system 300 stores and executes the music-related digital content access management application 390 of FIG. 3B. In addition, the computer system 300 may be in communication with a software program 304. Software program 304 may include the software code for the music-related digital content access management application 390. Software program 304 may be loaded on an external medium such as a CD, DVD, or a storage drive, as will be explained further below.

[0045] Furthermore, computer system 300 may be connected to a network 380. The network 380 can be connected in various different architectures, for example, client-server architecture, a Peer-to-Peer network architecture, or other type of architectures. For example, network 380 can be in communication with a server 385 that coordinates engines and data used within the music-related digital content access management application 390. Also, the network can be different types of networks. For example, the network 380 can be the Internet, a Local Area Network or any variations of Local Area Network, a Wide Area Network, a Metropolitan Area Network, an Intranet or Extranet, or a wireless network.

[0046] FIG. 3B is a functional block diagram illustrating the computer system 300 hosting the music-related digital content access management application 390 in accordance with an implementation of the present disclosure. A controller 310 is a programmable processor and controls the operation of the computer system 300 and its components. The controller 310 loads instructions (e.g., in the form of a computer program) from the memory 320 or an embedded controller memory (not shown) and executes these instructions to control the system. In its execution, the controller 310 provides the music-related digital content access management application 390 with a software system, such as to enable the creation and configuration of engines and data extractors within the asset managing application 390. Alternatively, this service can be implemented as separate hardware components in the controller 310 or the computer system 300.

[0047] Memory 320 stores data temporarily for use by the other components of the computer system 300. In one implementation, memory 320 is implemented as RAM. In one implementation, memory 320 also includes long-term or permanent memory, such as flash memory and/or ROM.

[0048] Storage 330 stores data either temporarily or for long periods of time for use by the other components of the computer system 300. For example, storage 330 stores data used by the music-related digital content access management application 390. In one implementation, storage 330 is a hard disk drive.

[0049] The media device 340 receives removable media and reads and/or writes data to the inserted media. In one implementation, for example, the media device 340 is an optical disc drive.

[0050] The user interface 350 includes components for accepting user input from the user of the computer system 300 and presenting information to the user 302. In one implementation, the user interface 350 includes a keyboard, a mouse, audio speakers, and a display. The controller 310 uses input from the user 302 to adjust the operation of the computer system 300.

[0051] The I/O interface 360 includes one or more I/O ports to connect to corresponding I/O devices, such as external storage or supplemental devices (e.g., a printer or a PDA). In one implementation, the ports of the I/O interface 360 include ports such as: USB ports, PCMCIA ports, serial ports, and/or parallel ports. In another implementation, the I/O interface 360 includes a wireless interface for communication with external devices wirelessly.

[0052] The network interface 370 includes a wired and/or wireless network connection, such as an RJ-45 or “Wi-Fi” interface (including, but not limited to 802.11) supporting an Ethernet connection.

[0053] The computer system 300 includes additional hardware and software typical of computer systems (e.g., power, cooling, operating system), though these components are not specifically shown in FIG. 3B for simplicity. In other implementations, different configurations of the computer system can be used (e.g., different bus or storage configurations or a multi-processor configuration).

[0054] FIG. 4 to FIG. 6 show process step details and variable used in connection with different generations 0-3 of music-related digital assets A 410, B 420 and C 430 such as music playlists created by different entities such as a celebrity 410, non-celebrity 420 and a computer program 430.

[0055] FIG. 4 shows generation “0” (GEN0) and generation “1” (GEN1) music-related digital assets. In one implementation, GEN0 is an original music-related digital asset (in this example, a mixtape playlist for music) that is created from “scratch” by a celebrity 410, non-celebrity 420, or Computer Program 430. The music-related digital asset is not derived in any way from a pre-existing music-related digital asset. Further, GEN1 is a new and unique derivative music-related digital asset 440, 450, 460 created by combining some or all of the contents from at least one GEN0 music-related digital asset 410, 420, 430 with some or all of the contents from any one or more other music-related digital assets (whether GEN0 or not).

[0056] FIG. 5 shows Generation “2” (GEN2) which is a new and unique derivative music-related digital asset 510, 520 created by combining some or all of the contents from at least one GEN1 music-related digital asset with some or all of the contents from any one or more other music-related digital assets (including GEN0 and GEN1). It should be noted that when a GEN0 music-related digital asset 410, 420, 430 is combined with a GEN1 music-related digital asset 440, 450, 460, the newly spawned derivative music-related digital asset retains a GEN1 attribute since it was derived from a GEN0 music-related digital asset. That is, a newly created, derived music-related digital asset (the “child” music-related digital asset) generation type is determined by adding one generation level to the lowest generation type attributed to one of the input music-related digital assets (“parent”).

[0057] FIG. 6 shows Generation “3” (GEN3) music-related digital asset 610, 620 in which the progression from one generation to the next continues without end based upon the rule that the derived music-related digital asset (the “child” music-related digital asset) generation type is determined by adding one generation level to the lowest generation type attributed to one of the input music-related digital assets (“parent”)).

[0058] In further implementations, the following attributes could be encoded into each music-related digital asset at the time of their creation, recordation, or sharing (such attributes to be irrevocable or amendable by the music-related digital asset’s creator or owner) be: (1) prohibited from being used in the creation of a subsequent derivative child music-related digital asset; (2) prohibited from being used in the creation of more than “x” numbers of subsequent derivative child music-related digital assets; (3) prohibited from being used in the creation of a subsequent derivative child music-related digital asset if outside a time period window for creating such derivative music-related digital asset; (4) prohibited from being used in the creation of a subsequent derivative child music-related digital asset absent the payment of a fee to the subject parent music-related digital asset; (5) prohibited from being used in the creation of a subsequent derivative child music-related digital asset if one or more of the other parent music-related digital assets used therein have characteristics (e.g., certain genres of music, certain musical artists, certain lyrics) that are not complementary to the attributes as specified within the subject parent music-related digital asset; (6) prohibited from being gifted, lent, or sold to another party seeking to utilize such music-related digital asset; (7) gifted, lent, or sold to another party seeking to utilize such music-related digital asset via music-related digital asset marketplace or analogous.

[0059] In addition, the following attributes could be encoded into each music-related digital asset at the time of their creation, recordation, or sharing (such attributes to be irrevocable or amendable by the music-related digital asset’s creator or owner). The music-related digital asset so created may include meta data describing and elaborating upon the contents of the music-related digital asset (e.g., information and data beyond the music playlist, including but not limited to imagery, sounds, music tracks, literature, photos, virtual reality experiences, augmented reality experiences, mixed reality experiences), wherein the contents of the music-related digital asset may be “played” for a user or owner of such music-related digital asset, the music-related digital asset may be capable of recording for posterity such interaction between the music-related digital asset and the user thereof (e.g., the music-related digital asset will record for posterity the first time a new artist song was played on the Digital Tape). Such posterity recordation may include one or more of the names of the song played, when it was played, how many times it was played, where it was played, who played it (user name), and analogous recordation elements.

[0060] The system and method described herein further contemplates the creation and use of a music-related digital asset marketplace where users may search for, discover, buy, sell, trade, create derivative works therein, or otherwise utilize the various music-related digital assets (GEN0 and onwards) as described herein.

[0061] Recording some or all of these features on a cryptographically secure blockchain (public or private) so that the music-related digital assets may be searched for, discovered, bought, sold, traded, and created on a transparent, immutable database system. By way of example, the assets may be fully fungible assets, non-fungible tokens, or analogous.

[0062] In the case of a music-related digital asset that takes the form of a digital, virtualized mixtape playlist of music, the contents therein (including any meta data still images, video, text, or analogous) may be played back in any one or more virtualized playback devices (e.g., such a virtualized cassette tape music player).

[0063] While the present disclosure contemplates the use of virtual mixtapes of music, the concepts and ideas of this disclosure are equally applicable to other non-music-related digital asset types (movies, TV shows, art work, literature, imagery, clothing, etc.) that are created as GEN0 non-music-related digital assets and then re-mixed in a collaborative fashion with other music-related digital assets and non-non-music-related digital assets to create GEN1, GEN2, etc., music-related digital assets and non-music-related digital assets of the same or different types (e.g., mixing music with film, mixing film with literature, etc.).

[0064] The description herein of the disclosed implementations is provided to enable any person skilled in the art to make or use the present disclosure. Numerous modifications to these implementations would be readily apparent to those skilled in the art, and the principals defined herein can be applied to other implementations without departing from the spirit or scope of the present disclosure. For example, variations to the virtual environment include augmented reality (AR) environments, online environments (MMO, social networks, etc.), and mobile companions to virtual environments. Variations to the content include contents other than songs and/or music videos (e.g., video, images, digital object collections, and mixed types). Other variations include editing of objects in collections (e.g., changing, combining, original content) and uniqueness restrictions, scarcity. Thus, the present disclosure is not intended to be limited to the implementations shown herein but is to be accorded the widest scope consistent with the principal and novel features disclosed herein.

[0065] All features of each above-discussed example are not necessarily required in a particular implementation of the present disclosure. Further, it is to be understood that the description and drawings presented herein are representative of the subject matter which is broadly contemplated by the present disclosure. It is further understood that the scope of the present disclosure fully encompasses other implementations that may become obvious to those skilled in the art and that the scope of the present disclosure is accordingly limited by nothing other than the appended claims.

Virtual Rights Management (“Song Guardian”)

[0066] The present disclosure pertains to the creation of a system where music-related digital assets are managed in unique and novel ways within virtual music-themed environment, and includes following additional implementations.

[0067] In one implementation, the present disclosure relates to computer-implemented systems and methods for creating, transferring and managing music-related digital assets, and more particularly to computer-implemented systems and methods of creating, transferring and managing virtual content rights associated with music-related digital assets such as music-related audio or video recordings, virtual mixed music tapes or playlists, music-related static images such as photos, paintings, and digitized art, etc., in a multiuser music-related digital content engagement platform.

[0068] The present system improves over existing multiuser media platforms such as online digital database and streaming services that involve the listening, sharing and viewing of music and other music-related digital content, by creating “virtual rights” to the underlying music-related digital content to be interacted with, where the virtual rights can be created, acquired, traded, assigned, licensed, etc. Such a system thereby provides motivation for users to enter, use, and stay engaged with the multiuser music-related digital content platform and also helps users become educated as to how music-related digital asset creation, ownership, transfer, and licensing may be accomplished in the real world as to actual underlying assets.

[0069] For example, in such a system involving songs and/or music videos as the music-related digital content, every song and/or music video can be provided with a single virtual title holder held by a unique user of the system. To acquire the asset, a user can enter the system, search for a song, and then decide to acquire the virtual title to the song. The user can then use the platform to acquire the virtual title to this song, such as by use of virtual currency, trades, credits, etc., and would then subsequently be listed as the virtual title holder of the music-related digital content in the system. For motivation to stay engaged with and use the system, so long as the user continues to come back into the system, the user can continue to retain the virtual title, but if the user fails to come back into the system, then the virtual title to that song may be released back to the community where other users can then acquire it.

[0070] In one aspect of the present disclosure, only one user can claim virtual title to a music-related digital asset such as a song. Namely, if User A has the virtual title to Song 1, and then another User B who seeks to acquire title to Song 1 cannot do so, at the moment, because User B would see that User A is the holder of the virtual title. User B, however, may be provided with options such as (1) making an offer to User A to acquire the virtual title to the song; (2) join a waiting list to have the opportunity to acquire the virtual title should User A allow it to expire, or (3) do nothing.

[0071] In one aspect, a user’s ownership of virtual title to a music-related digital asset such as a song would not restrict other users from playing the song, as it would still be playable like any other song. Owners could also build their own “music rooms” (e.g., a virtual room called say “User A’s Music Listening Room”) and make the song available in that virtual room, or it could be located into a themed listening room matching the genre of the song.

[0072] In one aspect of the system, every time a titled song is played anywhere in the system, the title holder would get rewarded, such as moving up levels as a system user or receiving points or other rewards. Thus, with the present system there is competitive incentive to have the virtual title to popular songs and/or music videos within the system. As new songs and/or music videos are released with the system, users can be motivated to come into the system to try and acquire the one virtual title available for the song. For example, new releases from popular artists may be highly desirable to acquire.

[0073] In some aspects of the present system, limits can be placed on the number of songs and/or music videos a user can hold virtual title to, such as five songs and/or music videos. In one aspect, each music-related digital asset in the system has one virtual title holder who must be a user of the system. Alternatively, the system could allow a song to have multiple virtual title owners. For example, 100 users could be permitted to have the virtual title to a single song.

[0074] The present system provides improvement over prior systems by using virtual content rights to music-related digital content to create competition, incentive, and envy among users to spur more usage and engagement within the system, and can create new ways to monetize user and super users or fans.

[0075] One aspect of the present disclosure provides a computer-implemented method for management of virtual content rights of music-related digital assets comprising: providing a virtual content rights database comprising data associating users of a music-related digital content engagement platform with users’ virtual content rights acquired with respect to music-related digital assets; receiving, at a platform administrator server, data indicative of a request from a user for assignment of virtual content rights of a music-related digital asset; determining, by the platform administrator server, whether the requested virtual content rights are eligible for assignment to the user and the terms of the assignment if eligible; notifying, by the platform administrator server, the user of the availability and a set of terms for the user to acquire the virtual content rights, the terms including duration of the assignment; receiving, by the platform administrator server, data from the user indicative of which of the terms are acceptable to the user as consideration for securing the virtual content rights; sending, by the platform administrator server to the user, data representing a digital contract based on the terms indicated to be acceptable to the user, the digital contract providing for assignment of the virtual content rights to the user in accordance with one or more of the accepted terms; receiving, by the platform administrator server, data indicative of agreement by the user to the digital contract; and updating, by the platform administrator server, the virtual content rights database to indicate the assignment of the virtual content rights to the user for the duration specified in the digital contract.

[0076] Another aspect of the present disclosure provides a computer-implemented method for management of virtual content rights of music-related digital assets comprising: providing a user access portal for a user to interact with a music-related digital content engagement platform that includes a virtual content rights database comprising data associating users of the music-related digital content engagement platform with users’ virtual content rights acquired with respect to music-related digital assets; sending request information entered by the user via the access portal to the platform administrator server, the request information including data representing a user request for assignment of virtual content rights of a music-related digital asset; receiving data via the access portal indicative of notification of the availability and a set of terms for the user to acquire the virtual content rights, the terms including duration of the assignment; sending acceptance information entered by the user via the access portal to the platform administrator server, the acceptance information including data representing which of the terms are acceptable to the user as consideration for securing the virtual content rights; receiving data via the access portal representing a digital contract based on the terms indicated to be acceptable to the user, the digital contract providing for assignment of the virtual content rights to the user in accordance with one or more of the accepted terms; and sending agreement information entered by the user via the access portal to the platform administrator server, the agreement information including data representing agreement by the user to the digital contract.

[0077] Basic method steps and variables involved in a user of a multiuser music-related digital content engagement platform seeking to obtain virtual content rights to a music-related digital asset are shown in FIG. 7 through FIG. 14.

[0078] FIG. 7 shows an overview 700 of steps involved with a user request to a platform administrator server, including: Start virtual content right process; (710) the user of a music-related digital content engagement platform requests assignment of one or more virtual content rights from the platform administrator; (720) platform administrator checks music-related digital content engagement platform’s virtual content rights database to see whether the requested virtual content right is eligible for assignment to the user, and if so, on what terms (sale, lease, in-kind exchange, user performance award, gift, etc.); (730) if the virtual content right sought is capable of being assigned to the user, the platform administrator will notify the user of availability and the terms (one or more options) for the user to acquire such virtual content right; (740) the user will review such terms and indicate to the platform administrator which set of terms, if any, is acceptable to the user as consideration for securing the virtual content right in question; (750) where the user indicates to the platform administrator that a set of terms is acceptable, a digital contract summarizing the assignment of such virtual content right shall be created by the platform administrator and delivered to the user for acceptance; (760) the user then is free to agree to, reject, or ignore the digital contract received from the platform administrator; (770) should user agree to the digital contract, the terms therein shall be memorialized within the virtual content rights database and the agreed upon virtual content rights shall be assigned to the user for the life of the digital contract; and stop virtual content right process.

[0079] FIG. 8 illustrates step (710) of FIG. 7. In FIG. 8, the user of the music-related digital content engagement platform requests assignment of one or more virtual content rights from the platform administrator server. In one implementation, the “music-related digital content” includes music-related audio recordings (e.g., music), music-related video recordings (e.g., film, TV, web shows), music-related static imagery (e.g., photos, paintings, digitized art), music-related live streamed content, combinations of various mediums, music-related digital virtual real estate, music-related digital virtual goods, and analogous music-related digital content.

[0080] In one implementation, a “virtual content right” includes an appropriate right (whether partial to comprehensive) that the platform administrator may be permitted to “legally” assign, either permanently or temporarily, to the user, for consideration or otherwise. Examples of a virtual content right includes the right of the user to earn “in-platform” points or credits whenever another platform user engages with or consumes the associated content (e.g., another user listens to a song that the user has the virtual content right to).

[0081] FIG. 9 illustrates step (720) of FIG. 7. In FIG. 9, the platform administrator checks music-related digital content engagement platform’s virtual content rights database to see whether the requested virtual content right is eligible for assignment to the user, and if so, on what terms (sale, lease, in-kind exchange, user performance award, gift, etc.).

[0082] The terms may include, but are not limited to, the user paying a fee for perpetual or time limited rights over the use of the subject content, the user being assigned such subject rights as consideration for trading some other platform associated content right(s) previously assigned to the user by the platform administrator, the user being assigned such rights as a reward for partaking in a particular in-platform activity (e.g., winning a sweepstakes, viewing certain ads), the user being assigned such rights for any other reason the platform administrator deems appropriate in their discretion as platform administrator, or analogous situations meriting the assignment of such rights to the user.

[0083] The terms may reflect the requirements of the party controlling the virtual content right, which might be the platform administrator or another user.

[0084] FIG. 10 illustrates step (730) of FIG. 7. In FIG. 10, if the virtual content right sought is capable of being assigned to the user, the platform administrator will notify the user of availability and the terms (one or more options) for the user to acquire such virtual content right.

[0085] The platform administrator may offer one or more options to the user, and may dynamically price such options. By way of example, the platform administrator might make the consideration vary depending on the time and manner the right is sought. Similarly, the platform administrator might offer the right to one user for consideration “x” and offering the same right to another user for consideration “y”, with the delta being determined by the status of each user (one is a higher ranked user compared to the other).

[0086] It is also contemplated that the terms are not generated by the platform administrator, but by another user that holds the virtual content right in question (and are merely being delivered to the user by the platform administrator).

[0087] FIG. 11 illustrates step (740) of FIG. 7. In FIG. 11, the user will review such terms and indicate to the platform administrator which set of terms, if any, is acceptable to the user as consideration for securing the virtual content right in question.

[0088] The user will be able to assess the offer based upon numerous factors, including data provided from the platform administrator relating to the performance qualities of the music-related digital content asset sought (e.g., revenues generated, play counts, biographical information relating to the creator of the music-related digital content, previous holders of the music-related digital content assets).

[0089] FIG. 12 illustrates step (750) of FIG. 7. In FIG. 12, where the user indicates to the platform administrator that a set of terms is acceptable, a digital contract summarizing the assignment of such virtual content right shall be created by the platform administrator and delivered to the user for acceptance.

[0090] The digital contract to be crafted utilizes the appropriate platform components, likely to include the virtual content rights database, the purchasing user’s platform account data, the selling user’s account data, and one or more access, audit, and payment databases supporting the platform generally.

[0091] FIG. 13 illustrates step (760) of FIG. 7. In FIG. 13, the user then is free to agree to, reject, or ignore the digital contract received from the platform administrator. The user may also be able to counter-offer (technically a rejection followed by new offer) to the holder of the virtual content right, whether it be the platform administrator or another user.

[0092] Offers may also be held open for a given period of time, whether at the direction of the platform administrator or the other user controlling such rights. Offers may also be held open for longer periods of time where the user pays consideration to keep such offer open (an option mechanic). Rejected offers may or may not result in the offer being made available to other users, or may require the rights holder to re-confirm the terms for assignment.

[0093] FIG. 14 illustrates step (770) of FIG. 7. In FIG. 14, should user agree to the digital contract, the terms therein may be memorialized within the virtual content rights database and the agreed upon virtual content rights can be assigned to the user for the life of the digital contract.

[0094] Recordation may be to an internal database or external database, including but not limited to blockchain databases to support music-related digital asset management.

[0095] The right assigned to the user may be retained one or more of: permanently; temporarily (subject to time limit, maintenance fee payments, satisfaction of maintenance actions by the user, etc.); or disposable at the option of the user (gifting to another, selling to another for cash or virtual currency, trading for other in-kind digital or non-music-related digital asset(s), etc.).

[0096] Future assignments, disposals, etc. are to be recorded in the virtual content rights database.

[0097] FIG. 15 shows an overview of steps involved with a platform administrator request, including: start virtual content right process; (1510) platform administrator queries the platform’s virtual content rights database to see whether any one or more of various virtual content rights is eligible for assignment to one or more users, and if so, on what terms (sale, lease, in-kind exchange, user performance award, gift, etc.); (1520) based upon the results of the database query, the platform administrator proposes an offer to a user to assign to such user one or more virtual content rights pertaining to subject content associated with the platform; (1530) the user will review such terms and indicate to the platform administrator which set of terms, if any, is acceptable to the user as consideration for securing the virtual content right in question; (1540) Where the user indicates to the platform administrator that a set of terms is acceptable, a digital contract summarizing the assignment of such virtual content right shall be created by the platform administrator and delivered to the user for acceptance; (1550) the user then is free to agree to, reject, or ignore the digital contract received from the platform administrator; (1560) should user agree to the digital contract, the terms therein shall be memorialized within the virtual content rights database and the agreed upon virtual content rights shall be assigned to the user for the life of the digital contract; and Stop virtual content right process.

[0098] The platform can accept and support a broad range of music-related content types and combinations, which include, but aren’t limited to music-related audio recordings (e.g., music), music-related video recordings (e.g., film, TV, web shows), music-related static imagery (e.g., photos, paintings, digitized art), music-related live streamed content, combinations of various mediums, music-related digital virtual real estate, music-related digital virtual goods, and analogous.

[0099] There are numerous embodiments of virtual content rights contemplated by the system, which may include one or more of the following:

[0100] Administrative Right: A virtual content right which grants the user the right to dictate rules or permissions in regards to how a piece of content can be used within the platform. For example, if a user acquired the virtual administrative right to a song, they could determine and set rules upon which other users of the platform must adhere to in order to play that song.

[0101] Reward Right: A virtual content right where the user accrues certain benefits and status within the virtual environment when their associated music-related digital asset performs a certain way (a) within the virtual environment and/or (b) in the real world.

[0102] Scarcity Right: A virtual content right where a music-related digital asset (such as a song) may only have one or limited number of ownership slots available within the platform. For example, if Song A had 10 ownership slots available, no more than 10 users could acquire those slots.

[0103] These virtual content rights can be combined in any way at the platform administrator’s discretion.

[0104] There are numerous embodiments and use cases contemplated by this system, with implementations including the following:

[0105] All music-related digital content types and combinations, including but not limited to music-related audio recordings (e.g., music), music-related video recordings (e.g., film, TV, web shows), music-related static imagery (e.g., photos, paintings, digitized art), music-related live streamed content, combinations of various mediums, music-related digital virtual real estate, music-related digital virtual goods, and analogous.

[0106] All music-related digital content consumption channels and combinations, including but not limited to desktop-based applications (native applications and web-based), mobile-based applications (native applications and web-based), console-based applications (native applications and web-based), TV set-based applications (native applications and web-based), and appliance-based applications (native applications and web-based).

[0107] All music-related digital content consumption platform types and combinations, including but not limited to audio only (e.g., music streaming services), 2D and 3D video (e.g., video games), virtual reality (e.g., video games), augmented reality (e.g., video games), and mixed reality (e.g., video games).

[0108] A primary embodiment of the system involves using the music-related digital content asset in a digital virtual environment (akin to Fantasy Football or Fantasy Baseball) where the user holding the virtual content right to that music-related digital content asset accrues certain benefits and status within the virtual environment when their associated music-related digital asset performs a certain way (a) within the virtual environment and/or (b) in the real world.

[0109] For instance, where the user is assigned the virtual content right to a piece of digital music that is often played by others within the virtual environment, the user would receive in-world virtual rewards, coins, points, or other status enhancements within the virtual environment each time the music was played within the virtual environment. Similarly, the user might receive additional virtual environment benefits when the music was played in the real world (with such plays verified by Billboard, Spotify, etc.

[0110] Notwithstanding these virtual reward payments, the real-world owner of the music-related digital content would still be entitled to their contractual cash payout for each play in the virtual environment or the real world, and the reward activities relating to the virtual content right would not affect these real-world rights and royalty expectations.

[0111] Below are further examples of the present disclosure.

[0112] In accordance with one aspect, every song has one virtual title holder, which is held by some unique user of the system. For example, say a user Jeff goes into the system and is a big fan of the music of Musician1. Jeff then searches the song Musician's Music, a song by Musician1, and then decides he wants to acquire the virtual title to this song. Using virtual currency, Jeff uses coins or the like to then acquire the virtual title to this song, and he is then subsequently listed as the virtual title holder within the system. So long as Jeff continues to come back into the system, he continues to retain the virtual title. But if he fails to come back in, then the virtual title to that song may be released back to the community where other users can then acquire it.

[0113] In one aspect, only one user can claim the “title” to a song. Using the above example, if Jeff has the virtual title to Musician's Music, and then another user, Mark, comes into the system and also likes Musician's Music, he cannot at the moment acquire it because he sees that Jeff is the virtual title holder. Mark then has options, and could (1) make an offer to Jeff to acquire the virtual title to the song from him; (2) join a waiting list to have the opportunity to acquire the virtual title should Jeff allow it to expire or (3) do nothing.

[0114] With a user’s ownership of virtual title to a song, this would not restrict other users from playing the song, as it would still be playable like any other song. Mark could also build his own “music room” (e.g., a virtual room called say “Mark’s Music Listening Room”) and make the song available in that virtual room, or it could be in say a Metal Themed Music Listening Room. In one aspect of the system, every time the song is played anywhere in the system, Jeff, the title holder, would get rewarded, such as moving up levels as a system user or be provided with other rewards. Thus, with the present system there is also competitive incentive to have the virtual title to popular songs and/or music videos within the system.

[0115] As new songs and/or music videos are released with the system, users will be compelled to come into the system to try and acquire the one virtual title available for the song. For example, new releases from popular artists may be highly desirable to acquire. Even for legacy or tail content, there will still be competition within niche areas or neighborhoods of the system, such as perhaps a “metal” genre neighborhood may be competitive for acquiring legacy Musician1 songs and/or music videos.

Virtual Music Themed World

[0116] The present disclosure pertains to the creation of a proprietary, affordable, robust, secure, adaptable, scalable, and entertaining music themed world that may be accessed, consumed, manipulated, and shared on a variety of multi-media digital engagement platforms.

[0117] Title

[0118] System & method for creating, maintaining, and growing of a virtual music themed world.

[0119] Abstract

[0120] The creation of an interactive, ever-expanding virtual environment (“computer system”) to be predominantly music themed where users may immersively experience all types of music through the use of a virtual environment device (e.g., a computer, game console, virtual reality headset, mobile phone, augment reality device) that can convey audio, visual, and haptic music experiences to one or more virtual environment world users. In the course of such virtual environment engagement, the users may interact with other users in a social manner, communicating with through text, chat, voice, visual, or analogous mediums. The users may also engage with others who are not concurrently present within the virtual environment world by leaving them messages in various forms, or by sending messages to others outside the virtual environment world completely (e.g., text message from within the virtual environment world to a text recipient outside the virtual environment world on a physical world phone). Further, the immersive nature of the virtual environment world will enable non-music types of interactions that are complementary to music engagement, including, but not limited to brand engagements, consumer purchase engagements for digital and/or physical merchandise (standard issue, user-generated, customizable, or otherwise), video games, scavenger hunts, rides, games of chance, games of skill, virtual concerts, story-telling experiences, virtual movies, virtual TV shows, virtual sport events, virtual esports events, ownership, customization, and use of virtual property, educational experiences, meditation, health, and mindfulness experiences, and analogous. To better support these types of diverse activities, the virtual environment world will employ a virtual and non-virtual currency system to promote economic interactions between the users and each other, the platform operators themselves, as well as non-user participants in the platform. Similarly, the system will support users in their various engagements by having various forms of informational prompts throughout, where users may be intelligently guided on the features of the system as they pertain to those users tastes and needs specifically (personalized guidance), and in some cases the informational prompts may take the form of artificial intelligence avatars (non-person characters) that present themselves to users a in world characters to be interacted with.

[0121] Significant Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0122] The computer system supporting this system can be centralized on a single computer, on an array of computers, be centrally housed, be distributed, and/or any combination thereof. The computer system can be used to provide instructions to music creators (human, artificial intelligence, or any combination thereof) on modifications to be made to the new and distinct piece of music under review by the present disclosure.

[0123] The computer system can be used to provide instructions to music creators (human, artificial intelligence, or any combination thereof) on the creation of new music.

[0124] The computer system can combine the analysis and results of multiple instances of pre-existing and new and distinct pieces of music and fundamental music segments extractions.

[0125] The computer system can be used to identify and advise on the types of musical attributes to be avoided in a given new and distinct piece of music under review by the present disclosure.

[0126] The computer system can be used to determine and/or confirm the possible ranges of new music popularity, the level of commercial appeal of new music, the level of synergy between the subject music and paired products, services, and advertisements, the price point or points at which the new music may be sold to different types of music listeners, and the therapeutic benefits likely to accrue to those listening to such new music.

[0127] The computer system can source a new and distinct piece of music for analysis through direct submission by the operator of the computer system.

[0128] The computer system can source a new and distinct piece of music for analysis by automatically crawling publicly available music pieces that are resident on third party systems (e.g., private databases or public Internet).

[0129] The computer system can support virtual concerts that enable artists to create a “volumetric” and/or “holographic” version of themselves and merge it with a virtual concert venue that they design from their imagination.

[0130] The computer system can support music listening rooms as a feature that customizes a virtual building and showcases songs and/or music videos, lyrics, videos, photography, and factoids in an immersive interactive experience.

[0131] The computer system can support artist ride experiences that take users on an immersive journey featuring one or more songs and/or music videos and simulating a traditional theme park ride.

[0132] Comprehensive personalization allowing users to customize their own music room, create virtual music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets), and apply virtual clothing, hair styles, hats, etc. onto their avatar.

[0133] The computer system can support virtual music avatars/personalities engaging with users via artificial intelligence and delivering personalized narratives, quests, and other voice powered interactions.

[0134] The computer system can support storytelling & immersive podcasts that tell an interactive story using a specific playlist of songs and/or music videos, visuals, and voiceover narration.

[0135] The computer system can support customer collection, engagement, retention, and reward mechanisms that are effective in a physical amusement park setting as imported into a virtual environment world setting.

[0136] The computer system can support design of the system to enable porting to various head mount display (“HMD”) systems, whether PC-tethered HMDs, game console-tethered HMDs, all-in-one mobile HMDs (e.g., Wi-Fi or cellular wireless connectivity HMDs), mobile phone “slide in” HMDs, or otherwise.

[0137] The computer system can support the creation of community events at scheduled times throughout the day (e.g., every hour the EDM city goes into a light show like the way Hong Kong does every night).

[0138] Advertising Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0139] The computer system can support numerous functions related to the engagement of users and advertisers, with such engagements accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0140] The computer system to support virtual billboards where users may engage with ad and get reward (virtual currency, content, or music-related digital assets). The rewards to range from free or discount coupons; and may be for in-world or outside-world assets.

[0141] The computer system to support virtual brand sponsored areas where users may engage with any activity within a brand sponsored area and get reward (virtual currency, content, or music-related digital assets). The rewards to range from free or discount coupons; and may be for in-world or outside-world assets.

[0142] The computer system to support virtual concerts where users engage with brand sponsored concerts and get reward (virtual currency, content, or music-related digital assets). The rewards to range from free or discount coupons; and may be for in-world or outside-world assets.

[0143] The computer system to support virtual mini-games where users engage with brand sponsored game and get reward (virtual currency, content, or music-related digital assets). The rewards to range from free or discount coupons; and may be for in-world or outside-world assets.

[0144] The computer system to support virtual mini-rides where users engage with brand sponsored game and get reward (virtual currency, content, or music-related digital assets). The rewards to range from free or discount coupons; and may be for in-world or outside-world assets.

[0145] The computer system to support virtual non-billboard artifacts where users engage with ad and get reward (virtual currency, content, or music-related digital assets). In this case, artifacts are to be stationary or moving (self-animated or moveable by user). The rewards to range from free or discount coupons; and may be for in-world or outside-world assets.

[0146] The computer system to support virtual product placement artifacts where users engage with product and get reward (virtual currency, content, or music-related digital assets). In this case, artifacts are to be stationary or moving (self-animated or moveable by user). The rewards to range from free or discount coupons; and may be for in-world or outside-world assets.

[0147] The computer system to support virtual product placement functional features (e.g., transportation) where end-users engage with product (e.g., Lyft, Uber) and get reward (virtual currency, content, or music-related digital assets). The rewards to range from free or discount coupons; and may be for in-world or outside-world assets.

[0148] Blockchain Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0149] The computer system can support numerous functions related to the use of blockchain technologies, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0150] The computer system to support the creation of virtual digital music-related merchandise scarcity, including mechanisms for the recordation and trading of such music-related digital assets.

[0151] The computer system to support the creation of one or more music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) scarcity, including mechanisms for fostering “breed-able” digital DNA music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets)/collaborative with artists who produce music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) that are designated by generation (e.g., the first generation of a mix tape so produced would be a “Gen0” mix tape).

[0152] The computer system to support the creation of virtual music-related digital “real estate” scarcity, including mechanisms for implementing blockchain scarcity, recordation, privacy, access controls, personalization spaces for user rooms or other real estate bought, sold, earned, or gifted. Further, the blockchain mechanisms to support economic activities associated with music-related digital real estate tied to artist brands (e.g., split revs with Artist when you buy and build house in “Artist Land”).

[0153] Browser Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0154] The computer system can support numerous functions related to the use of virtual web browsers located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0155] The computer system to support the creation of in-world virtualized browsers for user consumption of music entertainment content.

[0156] The computer system to support the creation of in-world virtualized browsers for user consumption of film and TV entertainment content.

[0157] The computer system to support the creation of in-world virtualized browsers for user consumption of news entertainment content.

[0158] The computer system to support the creation of in-world virtualized browsers for user consumption of shopping entertainment content.

[0159] The computer system to support the creation of in-world virtualized browsers for user consumption of sports entertainment content.

[0160] The computer system to support the creation of in-world virtualized browsers for user consumption of educational entertainment content.

[0161] The computer system to support the creation of in-world virtualized browsers for user consumption of analogous entertainment and non-entertainment content.

[0162] Commerce Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0163] The computer system can support numerous commercial activity functions located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0164] The computer system to support the discovery, interaction, ordering, and/or fulfillment of commercial consumption of digital entertainment and digital non-entertainment goods and services.

[0165] The computer system to support the discovery, interaction, ordering, and/or fulfillment of commercial consumption of physical entertainment and physical non-entertainment goods and services.

[0166] Communications Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0167] The computer system can support numerous functions related to the use of communication technologies, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0168] The computer system to support the creation of a virtual communication channel that allows messaging of various types (e.g., voice, text, chat, video, photos, emojis) to be originated by a party (e.g., platform operator, user, content owner and producer, third-party, advertiser) within the virtual environment world and be received by one or more parties inside of the virtual environment world (e.g., on-to-one communications, one-to-several communications, one-to-all communications).

[0169] The computer system to support the creation of a virtual communication channel that allows messaging of various types (e.g., voice, text, chat, video, photos, emojis) to be originated by a party (e.g., platform operator, user, content owner and producer, third-party, advertiser) within the virtual environment world and be received by one or more parties outside of the virtual environment world (e.g., on-to-one communications, one-to-several communications, one-to-all communications). In this case, the message receipt externally may be a third-party messaging application or a messaging application associated with the platform itself (e.g., a “companion app”).

[0170] In the case of internal and external messaging, one purpose may be to keep parties informed of virtual environment world happenings (new songs and/or music videos, games, rewards, concerts, etc.) when they are inside or outside of the virtual environment world (inside-out/outside-in functions).

[0171] Companion Application Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0172] The computer system can support numerous functions related to the use of a non-virtual environment world companion application residing on fixed and mobile devices outside of the virtual environment world system, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0173] The computer system to support the creation of a companion application that fosters notifications to parties outside of the virtual environment world relating to in-virtual environment world games, rides, stories, concerts, digital merchandise and service offerings, physical merchandise and service offerings, and analogous.

[0174] The computer system to support the creation of a companion application that fosters social (e.g., Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram) notifications to parties outside of the virtual environment world relating to virtual environment world activities.

[0175] The computer system to support the creation of a companion application that fosters a dedicated communication channel between parties outside of the virtual environment world and those inside the virtual environment world, with such communications taking the form of text, chat, voice, photos, videos, emojis, or analogous.

[0176] The computer system to support the creation of a companion application that allows parties outside of the virtual environment world to engage fully or partially with aspects inside the virtual environment world and earn points, credits, rewards, or otherwise as if they were engaging from inside the virtual environment world.

[0177] Virtual Concert Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0178] The computer system can support numerous functions relating to the delivery of live and/or recorded virtual concerts within the virtual environment world system, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0179] The computer system to support the creation of branded, real-world physical venues for concerts that are either recreated within the virtual environment world as CGI assets, volumetrically scanned, or rendered as a combination thereof.

[0180] The computer system to support the creation of branded, previously (i.e., no longer in existence) real-world physical venues for concerts that are either recreated within the virtual environment world as CGI assets, volumetrically scanned, or rendered as a combination thereof.

[0181] The computer system to support the creation of branded, non-real-world (fictional) venues for concerts that are either recreated within the virtual environment world as CGI assets, volumetrically scanned, or rendered as a combination thereof.

[0182] The computer system to support the creation of fictional or non-fictional virtualized venues for concerts that include a concert experience represented by virtual special effects such as fireworks, light shows, flying objects, and analogous that are generated by the platform administrator of the virtualized venue, a user of the virtualized venue, the users collectively of the virtualized venue, a brand sponsor of the virtualized venue, or a combination thereof.

[0183] The computer system to support the creation of fictional or non-fictional virtualized venues for concerts that include a concert experience represented by virtual user expressions such as configurable user dance moves, emotes, object displays (e.g., lighters, glow sticks), and analogous that are generated by the platform administrator of the virtualized venue, a user of the virtualized venue, the users collectively of the virtualized venue, a brand sponsor of the virtualized venue, or a combination thereof.

[0184] The computer system to support the creation of fictional or non-fictional virtualized venues for concerts that include a concert experience represented by user avatar participation in the virtual concert such as capturing of user avatar selfies, in-venue virtual flying drone image captures of users, feed of user avatar activities to one or more video screens within the venue (e.g., via fixed position or flying drone crowd cams, and analogous that are generated by the platform administrator of the virtualized venue, a user of the virtualized venue, the users collectively of the virtualized venue, a brand sponsor of the virtualized venue, or a combination thereof.

[0185] Digital Merchandise and Services Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0186] The computer system can support numerous digital merchandise and services activity functions located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0187] The computer system to support the discovery, interaction, ordering, and/or fulfillment of commercial consumption of user avatars.

[0188] The computer system to support the discovery, interaction, ordering, and/or fulfillment of commercial consumption of music-related digital virtual real estate.

[0189] The computer system to support the discovery, interaction, ordering, and/or fulfillment of commercial consumption of user personal space and avatar customization assets.

[0190] The computer system to support the discovery, interaction, ordering, and/or fulfillment of commercial consumption of user-controlled music rights where users can accrue prizes, points, tickets, credits, and other items of value when other users in the world engage with a song or music asset that is bound to the account of the music rights owner in the world.

[0191] The computer system to support the discovery, interaction, ordering, and/or fulfillment of commercial consumption activities that are recorded and maintained on a blockchain.

[0192] The computer system to support the discovery, interaction, ordering, and/or fulfillment of commercial consumption activities that are originated within the virtual music world and delivered physically in the real world (e.g., seeing a digital representation of an object ion the virtual world and ordering its physical analog for delivery to the user in the physical world).

[0193] Experience Discovery Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0194] The computer system can support numerous virtual environment experience discovery activity functions located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0195] The computer system to support the creation of a virtual environment music world directory guide, akin to a shopping mall kiosk that you can walk up to and see what else is in the world.

[0196] The computer system to support the creation of a “find your favorite artist” feature where a user can stare at a particular non-person character avatar (e.g., the musician Slash) and he will start interacting and talking to you (similar to having Mickey Mouse engage with a visitor at Disneyland). Similarly, a user might engage long enough or in a certain way (e.g., answer trivia) and receive rewards, merchandise, prizes, credits, etc. (rewards to be for in-world or outside-world assets or services). Conversely, if a user engages inappropriately the user will be punished (e.g., take a selfie with him without asking for permission and the user you might have their virtual phone camera smashed by the avatar on the ground).

[0197] The computer system to support the creation of a real-world map where a user can place a pin in the real city a user lives so people can see where people are visiting from (social feature).

[0198] The computer system to support the discovery of AI based music playlists, artificial intelligence driven virtual DJs, etc.

[0199] The computer system to support the creation of a searchable database that markets and sells platform music-related digital assets (e.g., concert tickets, music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets), gold records, music-related digital virtual real estate titles, virtual coins, tokens, digital merchandise) and can be seen by other users and enables buying, selling, trading of the same.

[0200] Virtual Character Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0201] The computer system can support numerous virtual character functions located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0202] The computer system to support the creation of permanent or continually changing virtual characters that populate the virtual world and interact with real users represented as avatars within the virtual world. The virtual characters may interact in several ways, either through mere presence within the virtual world, the sharing of basic information (e.g., event schedules), and making relevant suggestions or commentary to users based upon those same users’ virtual world preferences (e.g., using artificial intelligence or machine learning to interact with a user based upon the user’s past virtual world behaviors).

[0203] Further, these virtual characters may be influencers of taste within and outside the virtual world, and may have their own virtual apartments, shows, stores, brand endorsements, social media accounts, and analogous within and outside of the virtual world.

[0204] Environmental Effects Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0205] The computer system can support numerous virtual environmental effect functions located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0206] The computer system to support the creation of an ever changing and reskinning world assets (sky, buildings, rooms, fireworks, meteors, etc.). In this regard, the effects can be determined by the platform administrator of the virtual world, by an individual user (singular) taste, by a collective of users (collective) tastes, by brands, by artists, or by some combination thereof. In addition, the effects may be set to music or not.

[0207] Game Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0208] The computer system can support numerous virtual environment gaming functions located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0209] The computer system to support the creation of artist centric or genre/sub-genre centric scavenger hunts games with rewards, where items found are influenced by various aspects (location, skill, chance).

[0210] The computer system to support the creation of artist centric or genre/sub-genre centric dance games with rewards.

[0211] The computer system to support the creation of role-playing games where highest scoring players have status in music industry world, such as Mayor, Tenant, Tourist, etc.

[0212] The computer system to support the creation of mix tape competitions (e.g., which music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) are copied the most, played the most, etc.).

[0213] The computer system to support the creation of a new music “fight club” room or “March Madness” room for new songs and/or music videos stream counts from Billboard determine winners and losers (winner gets a prize).

[0214] The computer system to support the creation of virtual passport that gets virtually stamped as you go into different cities/neighborhoods/rooms and that passport can be seen by other users, as well as result in additional benefits or status accruing to the user as the number of stamps in their passport increases.

[0215] The computer system to support the creation of tracking and awarding users with the greatest number of re-mixed tapes created.

[0216] The computer system to support the creation of simple arcade games like Flappy Bird (type), Corn Hole, Carnival Ball Throw, Shooting Range, Bowling Alley. As an extension, the present disclosure also contemplates having objects thrown or shot are artists, records, guitars, speakers, disco balls, etc.

[0217] The computer system to support the creation of wagering type games (traditional or unique).

[0218] The computer system to support the creation of Song Guardian type game for both “Masters” and “Limited Editions”, where the virtual environment owner of that song gets virtual environment world royalties each time the song is played by others in the world.

[0219] The computer system to support the creation of music themed sweepstakes with prizes.

[0220] Mix Tape Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0221] The computer system can support numerous mix tape creation, publication, sharing, and exchanging functions located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0222] The computer system to support the creation of music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) exchanges and Walkman type device for playback and social enablement.

[0223] The computer system to support the creation of music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) to be placed within the virtual environment world to be found by other users.

[0224] The computer system to support the creation of mix tape playback on the user’s virtual mobile phone.

[0225] The computer system to support the creation of virtual environment world created music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) that are placed within the real physical world as geolocated music-related digital assets to be found by others (user or non-users using a mobile companion application or analogous).

[0226] Mobility Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0227] The computer system can support numerous mobility functions located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0228] Branded subway service (e.g., Boring Company) to travel to city, neighborhood, or a room.

[0229] Branded taxi service (e.g., Lyft) to travel to city, neighborhood, or a room.

[0230] Branded tour bus service (e.g., London Double Decker) to travel to city, neighborhood, or a room.

[0231] Mobile Phone UX Command–Teleportation, lateral and horizontal movement, quick search, hot buttons, etc.

[0232] Rewards Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0233] The computer system can support numerous reward functions located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated.

[0234] The computer system to support users engaging with concert performances and get rewarded (virtual currency, content, music-related digital assets, etc.). In the case of rewards, they may be for in-world or outside-world assets, and can range from free items to discount coupons.

[0235] The computer system to support users engaging with designated functional feature (e.g., a new search feature, or new mix feature) and get reward (virtual currency, content, music-related digital assets, etc.). In the case of rewards, they may be for in-world or outside-world assets, and can range from free items to discount coupons.

[0236] The computer system to support users engaging with games (scavenger hunt, games, wandering musician or guru who hands out rewards) and get reward (virtual currency, content, music-related digital assets, etc.). In the case of rewards, they may be for in-world or outside-world assets, and can range from free items to discount coupons.

[0237] Non The computer system to support users engaging with rides and get reward (virtual currency, content, music-related digital assets, etc.). In the case of rewards, they may be for in-world or outside-world assets, and can range from free items to discount coupons.

[0238] The computer system to support users engaging with any other activity within a designated virtual environment world area and get reward (virtual currency, content, music-related digital assets, etc.). In the case of rewards, they may be for in-world or outside-world assets, and can range from free items to discount coupons.

[0239] Virtual Music-Related Real Estate Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0240] The computer system can support numerous virtual music-related real estate functions located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0241] The computer system to support users engaging with virtual music-related real estate that is artist created, managed, or owned.

[0242] The computer system to support users that create their own “settlement” (e.g., a house with my music collection) where other users can visit and leave them messages (perhaps connecting your Instagram or FB works here too).

[0243] The computer system to support users engaging with virtual music-related real estate that is virtual environment music world operator created, managed, or owned.

[0244] Ride Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0245] The computer system can support numerous ride functions located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0246] The computer system to support users engaging “down the rabbit hole” ride experiences where the user experience starts with one song and meta data and it branches to five other songs and/or music videos (linked), that are further linked to another five, etc.

[0247] The computer system to support users engaging active ride experiences where user choices at various stages of the ride result in a changing narrative to the ride and the rewards earned (if any).

[0248] The computer system to support users engaging passive ride experiences where there are no user choices at various stages of the ride.

[0249] The computer system to support having rides “leave” every few minutes where multiple users can go on a particular virtual environment ride experience together (just like ride schedules at Disneyland).

[0250] The computer system to support users engaging in non-music thematic rides associated with film, TV artists, or other genres.

[0251] The computer system to support users engaging in rides where users are guided through the ride experience by celebrities, taxi drivers, or other analogous type of person or non-person entity.

[0252] Room Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0253] The computer system can support numerous room functions located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0254] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with mobile cellular carriers.

[0255] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with bars, sports bars, and restaurants.

[0256] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with gaming and gambling (and prizes).

[0257] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with simple games (and prizes). In this regard, rooms like Flappy Bird (type), Corn Hole, Carnival Ball Throw, Shooting Range, Bowling Alley. As an extension, the present disclosure also contemplates having objects thrown or shot are artists, records, guitars, speakers, disco balls, etc.

[0258] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with video game viewership.

[0259] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with health and wellness.

[0260] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with meditation and mindfulness.

[0261] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with museums.

[0262] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with non-Sony branded entertainment (e.g., comedy/film/TV).

[0263] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with pool halls.

[0264] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with record stores.

[0265] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with secret rooms (e.g., changing password at the door/solve a riddle/mention a favorite brand to gain access).

[0266] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with digital social activities.

[0267] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with social responsibility (e.g., Habitat for Humanity, Rock the Vote).

[0268] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with Sony branded entertainment (e.g., comedy/film/TV).

[0269] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with stem rooms (e.g., listen to songs and/or music videos where you can toggle stems on/off).

[0270] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with a talk show with curators discussing non-music content (film, TV, news, sports, fashion, food); and it is contemplated that the experiences might be either live and/or recorded.

[0271] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with tattoo parlors.

[0272] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with tilt brush types of user generated content.

[0273] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content such as museum type digital assets.

[0274] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with time capsule rooms/time travel rooms (e.g., user picks a year from the outside, and then on the inside the room transforms to that year in style and the playlist are only songs and/or music videos from that year).

[0275] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with trivia rooms. In this regard, the present disclosure envisions having music trivia nights (e.g., each night at 7 PM is a trivia competition with prizes). Possibly expand beyond music in later versions.

[0276] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with subjects of personal inspiration.

[0277] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with invitation only rooms (e.g., exclusivity for personal rooms or VIPs such as contest winners). Users can monetize their coolness by selling access to their spaces.

[0278] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with music artists.

[0279] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with DJs who do shows.

[0280] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with music genres.

[0281] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with karaoke bars with scheduled events (e.g., 8 PM is 80s night).

[0282] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with music labels.

[0283] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with music sponsors.

[0284] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with music discovery (all music), whether discovered through traditional music channels or alternative social or web channels (e.g., Twitter, Wikipedia, YouTube, latest news).

[0285] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with music documentaries (all music); including but not limited to talk show style rooms with curators discussing music content (live & recorded) as well as rooms with narration/story telling (e.g., Morgan Freeman voiceover takes you through an artist’s history).

[0286] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with music education; including but not limited to classrooms for how to play guitar, piano, music theory, history of music, etc. and where such lessons might also be sponsored by generic brand or music instrument brand.

[0287] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with music film scores. In this regard, the present disclosure may contemplate experiences based on partial music and partial film content, as well as talk show style rooms with curators discussing music content, and in each case possibly live and/or recorded.

[0288] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with music influencers (all music), where such experiences may focus on influences and inspirations from artists about artists and other motivational events. Other aspects may involve a focus on influencers and exploring what draws them to certain types of music.

[0289] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with music performance and Billboard type popularity rankings (all music), including data related to new entrants, leaders, laggards, etc.

[0290] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with music podcasts (all music), focusing on all stakeholders whether they be artists, critics, fans, or otherwise.

[0291] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with music talk show (all music). This would also extend to talk show style rooms with curators discussing music content, and could be live and/or recorded.

[0292] The computer system to support users engaging with rooms providing thematic content associated with a music talk show (a mixture of music and music commentary). An example being music discovery and talk show style rooms with curators playing and discussing music content (e.g., Gimme Radio), and may be live and/or recorded.

[0293] Social Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0294] The computer system can support numerous social functions located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0295] The computer system to support users utilizing social mechanics of users buying ads within the virtual environment world to promote their own rooms and user generate content.

[0296] The computer system to support users connect social networks like Instagram to their personal real estate spaces and auto populate these rooms with photos, etc. (e.g., have a picture frame on a wall auto load you Instagram photo).

[0297] The computer system to support users utilizing social mechanics for peer-to-peer gifting of digital and physical merchandise, services, or currency.

[0298] The computer system to support users utilizing social mechanics to ascertain the identity of another user or their space by making an inquiry (e.g., pressing button X).

[0299] The computer system to support users utilizing social mechanics to easily import third-party social media data (constantly evolving/refreshed Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, etc. feeds).

[0300] The computer system to support users utilizing social mechanics for peer-to-peer mix tape sharing.

[0301] The computer system to support users utilizing social mechanics for undertaking social media searches.

[0302] The computer system to support users utilizing social mechanics of utilizing traditional social APIs (Twitter/Instagram/Pinterest/FB) to communicate to others within and external to the virtual environment world.

[0303] “Song Guardian” Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0304] The computer system can support a “Song Guardian” game framework built across the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated.

[0305] The computer system to support users participating in a Song Guardian Masters virtual environment game, where a user can claim fictional in-world ownership rights to administer a song or video that plays within the virtual environment world.

[0306] In the course of being such a fictional owner, the user will earn digital royalty (e.g., virtual environment royalty) based on each of their song/video’s plays within the virtual environment world. Further, users might have to ask the fictional owner for permission to include the song in their mixtape, and the fictional owner can sell or trade an administered song or video for digital currency or another song or video title.

[0307] Further, the fictional owner can lose their administration rights to a song or video title based on lack of activity or failure to pay rents on the owned content.

[0308] Another feature contemplated is that the fictional owner can claim up to X number of song or video titles to administer, with such ceiling based upon achievement, other user play counts, use of song or video in music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets), etc. Alternatively, the fictional owner can claim up to X number of song or video titles to administer, subject to approval by the virtual environment world operator.

[0309] Each song or video title will contain a history of origin/provenance and the number of in-world shares that a fictional owner grants determines the acceleration of digital royalties earned and possible extra song and video administration slots.

[0310] In terms of distribution, certain upcoming popular songs and/or music videos and videos can be claimed via lottery that may contain extra physical loot.

[0311] The fictional owner can search for and connect with others with similar badge achievements.

[0312] The computer system to support users participating in a Song Guardian limited editions virtual environment game, where a user can claim fictional in-world ownership rights to administer a “limited edition” (rarer) song or video that plays within the virtual environment world.

[0313] In the course of being such a limited-edition fictional owner, the user will earn digital royalty (e.g., virtual environment royalty) based on each of their song/video’s plays within the virtual environment world. Further, users might have to ask the limited-edition fictional owner for permission to include the song in their mixtape, and the fictional owner can sell or trade an administered song or video for digital currency or another song or video title.

[0314] Further, the limited-edition fictional owner can lose their administration rights to a song or video title based on lack of activity or failure to pay rents on the owned content.

[0315] Another feature contemplated is that the limited-edition fictional owner can claim up to X number of song or video titles to administer, with such ceiling based upon achievement, other user play counts, use of song or video in music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets), etc. Alternatively, the limited-edition fictional owner can claim up to X number of song or video titles to administer, subject to approval by the virtual environment world operator.

[0316] Each limited-edition song or video title will contain a history of origin/provenance and the number of in-world shares that a fictional owner grants determines the acceleration of digital royalties earned and possible extra song and video administration slots.

[0317] In terms of distribution, certain upcoming popular limited-edition songs and/or music videos and videos can be claimed via lottery that may contain extra physical loot.

[0318] The limited-edition fictional owner can search for and connect with others with similar badge achievements.

[0319] User Generated Content (UGC) Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0320] The computer system can support UGC aspects throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0321] The computer system to support users creating graffiti artwork throughout the world. Places a user’s “ was here” message on a virtual environment world wall–like people would write their name on the wall of a bathroom. Ability to see other users who visited a room.

[0322] The computer system to support users submitting new music to be uploaded and voted on by other users.

[0323] The computer system to support users creating their own music via artificial intelligence tools (e.g., such as Amper).

[0324] User Voice Command Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0325] The computer system can support user voice commands aspects throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0326] The computer system to support the use of user-controlled voice commands to effect commercial transactions within the virtual environment world.

[0327] The computer system to support the use of user-controlled voice commands to effect user expressive actions such as performing dance moves, activating in-world special effects, or performing emotive expressions (e.g., likes, clapping, love hearts) within the virtual environment world.

[0328] The computer system to support the use of user-controlled voice commands to search for relevant content (e.g., songs and/or music videos, artists, genres, meta data, history, locations, digital merchandise, commerce) within the virtual environment world.

[0329] The computer system to support the use of user-controlled voice commands to effect social media interactions and communications within the virtual environment world.

[0330] The computer system to support the use of user-controlled voice commands to effect social media searching within the virtual environment world.

[0331] The computer system to support the use of user-controlled voice commands to effect transportation (by car, teleportation, portal) within the virtual environment world.

[0332] User Rooms Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0333] The computer system can support personalized user room aspects throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0334] The computer system to support the use of a personalized user room that can be decorated according to the tastes of the user. Examples of items to be used in the personalization include furniture, pictures, lighting, rugs, wall colors, etc.; whereby some items are free, some are purchased, some are earned.

[0335] The computer system to support the use of a personalized user dressing room that can be stocked according to the tastes of the user. Examples of items to be used in the personalization include virtual clothing, wigs, make-up, etc.; whereby some items are free, some are purchased, some are earned.

[0336] The computer system to support the use of a user room associated guest book that can be modified/signed by other users visiting the room.

[0337] The computer system to support the use of a user room in the creation of music-related digital assets (such as mix tapes and analogous music-related digital assets) by the user controlling such user room.

[0338] The computer system to support the use of a user room in the storage and display of awards, badges, and other citations associated with the user controlling such user room.

[0339] The computer system to support the use of a user room in the storage and display music-related digital assets owned or controlled by the user controlling such user room.

[0340] The computer system to support the use of a user room as a place where the user controlling such user room may upload and display (for themselves and/or others) their own personal audio, photography, art, video files, and analogous user sourced content.

[0341] The computer system to support users in socializing with other users and virtual characters in such personal user rooms.

[0342] User Status Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0343] The computer system can support user status aspects throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0344] The computer system to support user status records memorializing badges that users have earned for engagement with ads. For instance, users that have earn enough badges may be afforded the ability to achieve greater rewards and rights within virtual environment world. Further, users may be able to display badges within user room, or search for and connect with others with similar badge achievements.

[0345] The computer system to support user status records memorializing badges that users have earned for playing games, going on rides, attending concerts, etc. For instance, users that have earn enough badges may be afforded the ability to achieve greater rewards and rights within virtual environment world. Further, users may be able to display badges within user room, or search for and connect with others with similar badge achievements.

[0346] The computer system to support user status records memorializing badges that users have earned for playing music and watching music videos (this is distinct from the Song Guardian game referenced herein). For instance, users that have earn enough badges may be afforded the ability to achieve greater rewards and rights within virtual environment world. Further, users may be able to display badges within user room, or search for and connect with others with similar badge achievements.

[0347] The computer system to support user status records memorializing badges that users have earned for engaging with other users within the world. For instance, users that have earn enough badges may be afforded the ability to achieve greater rewards and rights within virtual environment world. Further, users may be able to display badges within user room, or search for and connect with others with similar badge achievements.

[0348] User Expression Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0349] The computer system can support numerous functions relating to the enablement of user expression features within the virtual environment world system, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0350] The computer system to support the creation of fictional or non-fictional virtualized environments (e.g., rooms, streets, concert venues, stores) for user expression that include a user expression capability represented by virtual special effects such as fireworks, light shows, flying objects, and analogous that are generated by the platform administrator of the virtualized environment, a user of the virtualized environment, the users collectively of the virtualized environment, a brand sponsor of the virtualized environment, or a combination thereof.

[0351] The computer system to support the creation of fictional or non-fictional virtualized environments (e.g., rooms, streets, concert venues, stores) for user expression that include a user expression capability represented by virtual user expressions such as configurable user dance moves, emotes, object displays (e.g., lighters, glow sticks), and analogous that are generated by the platform administrator of the virtualized environment, a user of the virtualized environment, the users collectively of the virtualized environment, a brand sponsor of the virtualized environment, or a combination thereof.

[0352] The computer system to support the creation of fictional or non-fictional virtualized environments (e.g., rooms, streets, concert venues, stores) for user expression that include a user expression capability represented by user avatar participation in the virtual environment such as capturing of user avatar selfies, in-environment virtual flying drone image captures of users, feed of user avatar activities to one or more video screens within the virtual environment (e.g., via fixed position or flying drone crowd cams, and analogous that are generated by the platform administrator of the virtualized environment, a user of the virtualized environment, the users collectively of the virtualized environment, a brand sponsor of the virtualized environment, or a combination thereof.

[0353] Video Rooms Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0354] The computer system can support video room aspects throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0355] The computer system to support the use of a video room that can be thematically designed to show concerts.

[0356] The computer system to support the use of a video room that can be thematically designed to show documentaries.

[0357] The computer system to support the use of a video room that can be thematically designed to show educational materials.

[0358] The computer system to support the use of a video room that can be thematically designed to show photo streams.

[0359] The computer system to support the use of a video room that can be thematically designed to show movies.

[0360] The computer system to support the use of a video room that can be thematically designed to show TV shows.

[0361] The computer system to support the use of a video room that can be thematically designed to show music story experiences.

[0362] The computer system to support the use of a video room that can be thematically designed to show sports and esports content.

[0363] Virtual Wallet Related Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0364] The computer system can support virtual wallet aspects throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0365] The computer system to support the use of a virtual wallet that stores and manages music-related digital assets that may be purchased using credit card or in-world virtual currencies.

[0366] The computer system to support the use of a virtual wallet that stores and manages a user’s rights data for in-world purchases (e.g., tickets for rides, rooms, concerts, digital goods).

[0367] The computer system to support the use of a virtual wallet that stores and manages music-related digital assets that are non-consumable in nature, such as badges, digital goods and merchandise represented by actual digital item to be viewed and manipulated within the virtual environment world, and digital goods and merchandise represented by actual digital item that cannot be viewed and manipulated within the virtual environment world (e.g., ownership title).

[0368] Miscellaneous Aspects of the Present Disclosure

[0369] The computer system can support numerous miscellaneous functions located throughout the virtual environment music world, with such functions accruing benefits to one or more of the platforms, the users, content owners and producers, third-parties, and the advertisers. In this regard, the following are contemplated:

[0370] The computer system to support the creation of numerous obvious and secret worm holes or analogous teleportation elements to move throughout the virtual environment world.

[0371] The computer system to support the creation of various room popularity rankings, including but not limited to the creation of ranking lists of rooms (what are most popular cities, neighborhoods, rooms, etc.).

[0372] The computer system to support the creation of a hi-resolution audio features such as hi resolution and/or immersive audio rooms. Further, in these scenarios there will be the option of creating an audio hardware branding opportunity.

[0373] The computer system to support the creation of a spatial audio customization with an ability for platform, artist, user, or other participant to program the audio sound qualities of a particular virtual environment space they control or are experiencing. In this regard, there will also be aspects of control to be derived from one or more of distances of space, ceiling, floor, and walls to a user, interior material types, interior openings, objects and people populating the space.

[0374] The computer system to support the creation of a troll rejection tool whereby a user will have the ability to shut off, silence, or otherwise remove another person within the virtual environment world that is bothering a user. Further, these removal actions may be visualized through metaphorical actions (explosion, rocket engines/fireworks, dissolve, melting, etc.).

[0375] The computer system to support the creation of a “God like” voice that occasionally gives a user a task or job to do as part of a game or engagement mechanic (e.g., the voice in a Wizard of Oz style or an airport style voice over with public announcement system).

[0376] The computer system to support the creation of a “spirit guide” to recommend or instruct the user on engagements. A guide can be human (e.g., musician or historic figure) or non-human form (animal, ghost, floating artwork, etc.), and might be selected by the user when they register with the platform. Some spirit guides may be free, earned, or purchased (music-related digital assets). It is further contemplated that they may be programmatic based upon user’s self-created profile and be driven by artificial intelligence or machine learning technology.

[0377] The computer system to support the creation of a mobile phone as the user’s user experience and in virtual world control center, and mimics the typical apps found on physical real-world mobile phone. In this manner, the mobile phone found in the virtual environment world would have similar value to the mobile phone a user might have in the real world. Such customizable virtual mobile phones to have functions where users may easily swap out phone brands/colors/models (e.g., swapping for free, or for a reward/compensation). Similarly, the virtual mobile phone would have other properties that would mimic other physical world phone elements, such as where the user drops the virtualized phone and the virtualized mobile phone screen breaks. The user would then need to spend in-world virtual currency to fix it.

[0378] The computer system to support the creation of a floating chain letter that randomly moves across the virtual environment world–you can grab it and write your name or leave message.

[0379] The computer system to support the creation of an in-world friend search feature to assist a user in finding existing and new friends by age/gender/location/playlist characteristic.

[0380] The computer system to support the creation of a virtualized geolocation syncing search feature so that a user might find another user’s geolocation within the virtual world.

[0381] The computer system to support the creation of a graffiti artist feature within the virtual environment music world. User to have the ability of painting on common areas, own room, friends’ spaces; and users to use free paints, purchased paints, and earned paints.

[0382] The computer system to support the creation of a digital artifact that metaphorically represents music to be consumed by a user, with the ability to collect, arrange, distribute, and consume music that is presenting itself in a physical form not traditionally associated with music (as a food, drink, pill, herb, or analogous). Within these music-related artifacts, meta data and other properties may be embedded that pertains to the virtual environment music world or the elements therein.

You may also like...