Magic Leap Patent | Efficient Data Layouts For Convolutional Neural Networks

Patent: Efficient Data Layouts For Convolutional Neural Networks

Publication Number: 20200082215

Publication Date: 20200312

Applicants: Magic Leap

Abstract

Systems and methods for efficient implementation of a convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network are disclosed. In one aspect, weight values of kernels in a kernel stack of a convolutional layer can be reordered into a tile layout with tiles of runnels. Pixel values of input activation maps of the convolutional layer can be reordered into an interleaved layout comprising a plurality of clusters of input activation map pixels. The output activation maps can be determined using the clusters of the input activation map pixels and kernels tile by tile.

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims priority to, and is a continuation of, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 15/724,142, which was filed on Oct. 3, 2017 and is entitled “EFFICIENT DATA LAYOUTS FOR CONVOLUTIONAL NEURAL NETWORKS.” U.S. patent application Ser. No. 15/724,142 claims the benefit of priority to U.S. Patent Application No. 62/403,930, filed Oct. 4, 2016, entitled “EFFICIENT DATA LAYOUTS FOR CONVOLUTIONAL NEURAL NETWORKS.” Each of the above-recited applications is hereby incorporated herein by reference in their entirety. Any and all applications for which a foreign or domestic priority claim is identified in the Application Data Sheet as filed with the present application are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety under 37 CFR 1.57.

COPYRIGHT AND TRADEMARK NOTICE

[0002] A portion of the disclosure of this patent document contains material which is subject to copyright protection. The copyright owner has no objection to the facsimile reproduction by anyone of the patent document or the patent disclosure, as it appears in the Patent and Trademark Office patent file or records, but otherwise reserves all copyright rights whatsoever.

BACKGROUND

Field

[0003] The present disclosure relates generally to systems and methods for implementing convolutional neural network and more particularly to efficient data layouts for implementing a convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network.

Description of the Related Art

[0004] A convolutional neural network (CNN) describes a topology for an artificial neural network. A CNN can be used for eye image segmentation and eye tracking. A CNN can be used for other classification problems such as gesture recognition. To determine output activation maps of a convolutional layer of a CNN, the convolutional layer can convolve input activation maps and kernels of the convolutional layer. Computing convolutions can be computationally expensive or intensive.

SUMMARY

[0005] Performing convolution operations efficiently in a hardware computing system can present many challenges. Accordingly, the present disclosure provides examples of systems and methods for efficient implementation of convolutional neural networks. The systems and methods can be used in any application in which CNNs are utilized such as, for example, augmented reality, mixed reality, virtual reality, machine learning, computer vision, facial recognition, eye tracking, object recognition, character, language, or speech analysis, computer games, and so forth.

[0006] In one aspect, a method for efficient implementation of a convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network is disclosed. The method is under control of a hardware processor and comprises: receiving a convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network, wherein the convolutional layer comprises kernels in a kernel stack, and wherein the kernels of the kernel stack are in a basic kernel layout; reordering weight values of the kernels of the kernel stack from the basic kernel layout into a tile kernel layout comprising a plurality of kernel tiles, wherein a kernel tile comprises a plurality of kernel runnels, and wherein a kernel runnel comprises a number of the weight values of the kernels of the kernel stack; receiving input activation maps of the convolutional layer, wherein the input activation maps are in a basic input activation map layout; reordering pixel values of the input activation maps from the basic input activation map layout into an interleaved input activation map layout comprising a plurality of clusters of input activation map pixels; and determining output activation maps of the convolutional layer from the plurality of kernel tiles and the plurality of clusters of input activation map pixels, wherein the output activation maps are in an interleaved output activation map layout comprising a plurality of clusters output activation map pixels.

[0007] In another aspect, a method for efficient implementation of a convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network is disclosed. The method is under control of a hardware processor and comprises: receiving a convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network comprising kernels in a kernel stack, wherein the kernels of the kernel stack are in a tile kernel layout comprising a plurality of kernel tiles of kernel runnels; receiving input activation maps of the convolutional layer, wherein the input activation maps are in a basic input activation map layout; reordering pixel values of the input activation maps from the basic input activation map layout into an interleaved input activation map layout comprising a plurality of clusters of input activation map pixels; and determining output activation maps of the convolutional layer from the plurality of kernel tiles and the plurality of clusters of input activation map pixels, wherein the output activation maps are in an interleaved output activation map layout comprising a plurality of clusters of output activation map pixels.

[0008] In yet another aspect, a method for efficient implementation of a convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network is disclosed. The method is under control of a hardware processor and comprises: receiving a convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network comprising kernels in a kernel stack, wherein the kernels of the kernel stack are in a tile kernel layout comprising a plurality of kernel tiles of kernel runnels; receiving input activation maps of the convolutional layer, wherein the input activation maps are in an interleaved input activation map layout; and determining output activation maps of the convolutional layer from the plurality of kernel tiles and the plurality of clusters of input activation map pixels, wherein the output activation maps are in an interleaved output activation map layout comprising a plurality of clusters of output activation map pixels.

[0009] In a further aspect, a method for efficient implementation of a convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network is disclosed. The method is under control of a hardware processor and comprises: receiving a convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network comprising kernels in a kernel stack, wherein the kernels of the kernel stack are in a tile kernel layout comprising a plurality of kernel tiles of kernel runnels, and wherein a dimension of a kernel is one; receiving input activation maps of the convolutional layer, wherein the input activation maps are in a basic input activation map layout; reordering pixel values of the input activation maps from the basic input activation map layout into an interleaved input activation map layout comprising a plurality of clusters of input activation map pixels by striding; and determining output activation maps of the convolutional layer from the plurality of kernel tiles and the plurality of input activation map tiles, wherein the output activation maps are in a transposed, interleaved output activation map layout comprising a plurality of clusters of output activation map.

[0010] Details of one or more implementations of the subject matter described in this specification are set forth in the accompanying drawings and the description below. Other features, aspects, and advantages will become apparent from the description, the drawings, and the claims. Neither this summary nor the following detailed description purports to define or limit the scope of the inventive subject matter.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0011] FIG. 1 shows a schematic illustration of an example two-dimensional (2D) convolution.

[0012] FIG. 2 schematically illustrates an example three-dimensional (3D) convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network.

[0013] FIG. 3 shows a schematic illustration of a single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) register of width four not fully utilized by convolutions of 3.times.3, 1.times.3, or 3.times.1 kernels.

[0014] FIG. 4 schematically illustrates an example reordering of pixel values of input activation maps of a convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network.

[0015] FIGS. 5A-5C schematically illustrate examples of reordering weight values of kernels of a kernel stack into a tile format comprising tiles of runnels.

[0016] FIGS. 6A and 6B schematically illustrate examples reordering of kernel weights of a kernel stack into a tile format comprising tiles of runnels.

[0017] FIG. 7 schematically illustrates another example reordering of kernel weights of a kernel stack into a tile format comprising tiles of runnels.

[0018] FIG. 8 schematically illustrates an example 3D convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network for illustrating determining output activation maps tile by tile.

[0019] FIGS. 9A-9B schematically illustrate an example 3D convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network for illustrating determining output activation maps tile by tile with kernel stack runnels straddling multiple rows of kernel stack weight values.

[0020] FIG. 10 is a flow diagram of an example process of determining output activation maps of a convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network tile by tile which optionally includes reordering pixel values of input activation maps and weight values of kernels into an interleaved layout and tiles of runnels respectively.

[0021] FIG. 11 schematically illustrates an example of reordering weight values of kernels of a kernel stack into a tile format comprising tiles of runnels.

[0022] FIG. 12 schematically illustrates an example of a wearable display system.

[0023] Throughout the drawings, reference numbers may be re-used to indicate correspondence between referenced elements. The drawings are provided to illustrate example embodiments described herein and are not intended to limit the scope of the disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Overview

[0024] Models representing data relationships and patterns, such as functions, algorithms, systems, and the like, may accept input, and produce output that corresponds to the input in some way. For example, a model may be implemented as a machine learning method such as a convolutional neural network (CNN) or a deep neural network (DNN). Deep learning is part of a broader family of machine learning methods based on the idea of learning data representations as opposed to task specific algorithms–shows a great deal of promise in solving audio-visual computational problems critical to augmented reality, mixed reality, virtual reality, and machines intelligence. In machine learning, a convolutional neural network (CNN, or ConvNet) can include a class of deep, feed-forward artificial neural networks, and CNNs have successfully been applied to analyzing visual imagery. Machine learning methods include a family of methods that can enable robust and accurate solutions to a wide variety of problems, including eye image segmentation and eye tracking. However, machine learning methods can be computationally intensive or expensive. Accordingly, performing machine learning methods efficiently can enable applications of machine learning methods on embedded platforms with limited resources.

[0025] The parameters of a machine learning model can be learned in a process referred to as training. For example, a machine learning model can be trained using training data that includes input data and the correct or preferred output of the model for the corresponding input data. The machine learning model can repeatedly process the input data, and the parameters (e.g., the weight values) of the machine learning model can be modified in what amounts to a trial-and-error process until the model produces (or “converges” on) the correct or preferred output. For example, the modification of weight values may be performed through a process referred to as “back propagation.” Back propagation includes determining the difference between the expected model output and the obtained model output, and then determining how to modify the values of some or all parameters of the model to reduce the difference between the expected model output and the obtained model output.

[0026] A convolutional neural network (CNN), a subcategory of the machine learning methods, can be used in a variety of applications, such as segmenting eye images. An eye image can include the periocular region of the eye, which includes the eye and portions around the eye such as eyelids, eyebrows, eyelashes, and skin surrounding the eye. An eye image can be segmented to generate the pupil region, iris region, or sclera region of an eye in the eye image. An eye image can also be segmented to generate the background of the eye image, including skin such as an eyelid around an eye in the eye image. The segmented eye image can be used for iris identification and eye tracking.

[0027] Eye tracking can be useful in a variety of virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), or mixed reality (MR) applications. For example, a virtual menu displayed to a user of a VR, AR, or MR device may be positioned spatially based on the orientations of the user’s eyes (e.g., with respect to yaw, pitch, or roll of the one or more eyes). As the user’s eyes move, the virtual menu may be repositioned accordingly. As another example, a user of a VR, AR, or MR device may scroll through a virtual menu by eye movements. As a further example, a user may give a command to a VR, AR, or MR device using eye movements. Furthermore, eye tracking can be used for alignment methods such as display alignment and proper rendering. Accordingly, because CNNs can be useful for numerous applications, efficient implementation of CNNs that achieve a high degree of hardware utilization can enable applications of CNNs, such as robust implementation of eye tracking and other computer vision methods, on embedded devices (e.g., VR, AR, or MR devices) with limited resources.

[0028] Systems and methods disclosed herein can enable efficient implementations of CNNs, on computing devices such as a computer server, a personal computer, a tablet computer, a mobile device, or an embedded device. A computing device can include a vector processor, a very long instruction word (VLIW) vector processor, or single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) processors. Efficient implementations of CNNs can be based on efficient data layouts of input activation maps, kernels, or output activation maps.

[0029] A convolutional layer of a CNN can include a kernel stack of kernels. A kernel of a convolutional layer, when applied to its input, can produce a resulting output activation map showing the response to that particular learned kernel. However, computing convolutions can be computationally expensive or intensive. And a convolutional layer can be computationally expensive. For example, convolutional layers can be the most computationally expensive layers of a CNN because they require more computations than other types of CNN layers (e.g., subsampling layers). The resulting output activation map can then be processed by another layer of the CNN. Other layers of the CNN can include, for example, a normalization layer (e.g., a brightness normalization layer, a batch normalization (BN) layer, a local contrast normalization (LCN) layer, or a local response normalization (LRN) layer), a rectified linear layer, an upsampling layer, a concatenation layer, a pooling layer, a fully connected layer, a linear fully connected layer, a softsign layer, a recurrent layer, or any combination thereof.

[0030] A kernel stack of a CNN can include M rows of kernels and N columns of kernels, with each column also referred to as a filter bank of the kernel stack. The kernels of the kernel stack can have the same width and the same height. The convolutional layer can have M input channels for receiving M input activation maps. The convolutional layer can have N output channels for producing N output activation maps. Each output activation map can be a result of a three-dimensional convolution of a filter bank of the kernel stack and the corresponding input activation maps.

[0031] In some implementations, to efficiently implement a convolutional layer, weight values of the kernels of the kernel stack can be reordered into a tile layout for kernels. The tile layout for kernels comprises tiles of runnels of weight values. A runnel can be an ordered list of weight values with the following two properties. First, the number of weight values in a runnel can be the same as the number of weight values a processor register such as a SIMD register can contain at once given the data type of the weight values. For example, for a 128-bit SIMD register, a runnel can contain eight half-precision floating point weight values or four single-precision floating point weight values. Second, runnels can be filled iteratively by traversing along the width dimension of the kernel stack (M), followed by the height dimension of the kernel stack (N), followed by the width dimension of the individual kernel, and followed by the height dimension of the individual kernel. The traversal continues until the runnel is completely filled with weight values of kernels of the kernel stack.

[0032] In some implementations, pixel values of the input activation maps can be reordered into an interleaved layout. For example, after a convolutional layer receives M input activation maps, the pixel values of the input activation maps can be reordered from a basic layout for input activation maps to an interleaved layout for input activation maps. In some implementations, the pixel values can be ordered such that the first pixel value of the first input activation map can be followed by the first pixel of the second input activation map, and so on until the first pixel value of the last (i.e., Mth) input activation map. The first pixel value of the last input activation map can be followed by the second pixel value of the first input activation map, the second pixel value of the second input activation map, and so on until the second pixel value of the last input activation map. This reordering can continue until all the pixel values of all of the input activation maps of the convolutional layer have been similarly ordered. The reordering process can result in a large reordered input activation map, which includes all individual input activation maps. Each indexed location in the reordered input activation map can include a cluster of the pixel values from the individual input activation maps at that index. Advantageously, this reordering needs to be performed at most once by, for example, an initial convolutional layer or a first convolutional layer of the CNN. In some embodiments, no reordering may be necessary. For example, the first convolution layer can convolve one input activation map and produces multiple output activation maps. In this case, no reordering of the pixel values of the input activation map may be necessary. Convolving one input activation map to generate multiple output activation maps may be considered as performing a number of two-dimensional (2D) convolutions on one input activation map in parallel. Advantageously, the methods disclosed herein may allow efficient computations of 2D convolutions on a single input activation map.

[0033] Output activation maps of the convolutional layer in an interleaved layout can be determined tile by tile. For example, for a cluster of weight values of the output activation maps: perform a fused-multiply-add operation on output activation map pixel values, reordered input activation map pixel values, and kernel tile. In some implementations, the output activation maps of the convolutional layer in an interleaved layout can be ordered into a basic layout for output activation maps.

[0034] An efficiently implemented CNN based on the systems and methods disclosed herein can advantageously enable efficient computation of a convolution of an input activation map with a kernel in terms of the processing or mathematically aspect of convolutional layer. Thus, an application based on the CNN may operate at interactive rates on a computing device such as such as a computer server, a personal computer, a tablet computer, a mobile device, or an embedded device. In addition, in some embodiments, an efficiently implemented CNN can allow high utilization of the limited amount of fast memory available on computing devices (e.g., embedded processors of embedded devices) because data replication is unnecessary, a huge improvement for implementing a CNN using embedded processors. Furthermore, the data layouts disclosed herein can enable efficient processing of other layers of a CNN that are not convolutional layers (e.g., up sampling and down sampling layers). Without having to rearrange input activation maps, the input activation maps can be down sampled or up sampled in parallel by a vector processor. Data reordering may be done once or not at all, depending on the structure of the CNN. Thus, the benefits of the systems and methods disclosed herein extend beyond efficient convolution computations.

[0035] Furthermore, an efficiently implemented CNN can have high performance or low power consumption. In some implementations, the systems and methods disclosed herein can advantageously reduce power consumption of a computing device implementing a CNN because the processor of the computing device may be in an on state or a high frequency state for a shorter period of time. Optimizing the CNN, for example a convolutional layer of the CNN, may achieve improved, optimal, or maximum performance at a given power envelope, which can be useful for computing devices (e.g., embedded devices) with constrained performance or power envelop.

[0036] Convolutions are both computationally expensive, and non-trivial to map to the capabilities of underlying vector processors. Since maximizing utilization of the hardware resources available (e.g., compute, memory, and generally speaking processor die space allocated to the two) at the lowest cost (e.g., monetary, power consumption, and heat generation) is very much desirable, optimization of this computationally heavy operation both at the hardware and software level using the methods of the present disclosure can be advantageous.

[0037] The disclosed methods reorder the data such that convolutions can be performed in an improved or optimal fashion on vector processors both with regards to compute (e.g., in the sense that the number of multiply-accumulates required to perform convolutions using this method is reduced to approximately the minimum number of operations mathematically required to carry out the operation correctly), or with regards to memory usage (e.g., in the sense that unlike competing methods such as im2col, little or no extra amount of memory is required–im2col achieves high computational efficiency at the cost of duplication of data which makes it inefficient memory-wise). The embodiments disclosed herein balance the tradeoff between flexibility, performance, and ease of implementation.

Example Two-Dimensional Convolution

[0038] One approach to solve complex problems can be the divide and conquer approach by breaking the problem down to simpler, more manageable components, and continuing doing so recursively until the complex problem can be entirely divided into constituents that can be easier to solve as a unit. These subproblems can be thought of as nodes or vertices in a graph.

[0039] Having solved theses subproblems, their results need to be somehow aggregated to arrive at the solution to the original, complex problem. Methods for combining the results of the subproblems can range from simple (e.g., an element wise addition) to a complex mathematical formula. The operations that combine the results of the subproblems can be represented as connections or edges in a graph.

[0040] This graph of nodes and edges (corresponding to subproblems and combining the results of the subproblems) can form a network which receives the network’s input, and performs a series of computations on the input and intermediate results to arrive at the desired output of the network. The network can be referred to as a neural network or an artificial neural network in that it represents how a mammalian brain functions, with neurons as vertices and axons as the edges that form this graph. The network is artificial in the sense that it is a computational entity, analogous to biological neural networks in animals, but implemented by computing devices.

[0041] A convolution operation can be a mathematical operation on two functions (for example continuous functions f and g) to produces a third function. The third function can be considered as a modified version of one of the two original functions, based on the integral of the pointwise multiplication of the two functions as a function of the amount that one of the original functions is translated. A convolution operation on the two functions f and g can be expressed as Equation (1) below:

(f*.sub.9)(t)=.intg..sub.-.infin..sup.+.infin.f(.tau.)g(t-.tau.)d.tau.. Equation (1)

Thus, to determine the convolution of two functions f and g, around the variable t can be summarized by the pseudo-codes below:

[0042] (1) Set a sum variable to zero.

[0043] (2) From minus infinity to plus infinity for the r variable:

[0044] (2a) Take r to be the next value in the list of above range.

[0045] (2b) Calculate values of the functions f and g at points f (.tau.) and g(t-.tau.).

[0046] (2c) Multiply the two values calculated at (2b) together.

[0047] (2d) Add up the value calculated at (2c) to the sum variable.

[0048] (2e) Go to (2a) and repeat the process.

[0049] End of (2)

[0050] In image processing, convolutions of images can be determined similarly. For example, a convolutional layer can receive as its input an input activation map which can be analogous to the function g above. The convolutional layer can convolve the input activation with a kernel, which can be analogous to the function f above, to determine an output activation map of the convolutional layer. The kernel can be a matrix, that is, a two-dimensional array of weight values. The multiplication of values of the input activation map and the kernel is analogous to the action (2c) above. Unlike the functions f and g which are continuous, the input activation map comprises discrete pixel values and the kernel comprises discrete weight values. Thus, the integral in Equation (1) can be replaced with a summation.

[0051] FIG. 1 shows a schematic illustration of an example 100 two-dimensional (2D) convolution. The example 2D convolution 100 convolves an input activation map 104 (also referred to as an input feature map, an input image, or an input channel) with a kernel 108 to determine an output activation map 112 (also referred to as an output feature map, an output image, or an output channel). The input activation map 104, with a width of five pixels and a height of five pixels, includes 25 pixel values. The numbers in the input activation map 104 denote pixel values of the input activation map 104. As shown, the five rows of the input activation map 104 can have pixel values (1, 1, 1, 0, 0), (0, 1, 1, 1, 0), (0, 0, 1, 1, 1), (0, 0, 1, 1, 0), and (0, 1, 1, 0, 1) respectively. The kernel 108 as shown is a 3.times.3 kernel, that is, the kernel 108 has a height of three weight values and a width of three weight values. The numbers in the kernel 108 denote weight values of the kernel 108. The three rows of weight values of the kernel 108 can be (1, 0, 1), (0, 1, 0), and (1, 0, 1).

[0052] A convolution of the input activation map 104 with the kernel 108 can be expressed by Equation (2) below:

(f*g)(t)=.SIGMA..sub..SIGMA.=(-1,-1).sup.(+1,+1)f(.tau.)g(t-.tau.), Equation (2)

where .tau. represents positions of the weight values of the kernel 108, and t represents positions of pixel values of the output activation maps 112. A weight value 108e at the center of the kernel 108 can have a .tau. value of (0, 0). A weight value 108a can have a r value of (-1, -1). A weight value 108g can have a .tau. value of (-1, +1). A weight value 108i can have a .tau. value of (+1, +1).

[0053] The numbers in the output activation map 112 denote the pixel values of the output activation map 112. A pixel value 112e at the center of the output activation map 112 is at position (2, 2) of the output activation map 112. A pixel value 112a can be at position (1, 1) of the output activation map 112. A pixel value 112g can be at position (1, 3) of the output activation map 112. A pixel value 112i can be at position (3, 3) of the output activation map 112.

[0054] To determine the pixel value 112a at position (1, 1) of the output activation map 112, the following multiplications can be performed: A pixel value 104a can be multiplied by a weight value 108j; A pixel value 104b can be multiplied by a weight value 108i; A pixel value 104c can be multiplied by a weight value 108h; A pixel value 104e can be multiplied by a weight value 108g; A pixel value 104f can be multiplied by a weight value 108f; A pixel value 104g can be multiplied by a weight value 108e; A pixel value 104h can be multiplied by a weight value 108c; A pixel value 104i can be multiplied by a weight value 108b; and A pixel value 104j can be multiplied by a weight value 108a. Furthermore, an accumulation or a summation of the results of the above multiplications can be performed.

[0055] Other pixel values of the output activation map 112 can be similarly determined. Equation (3) below shows determining pixel values 112a-112i of the output activation map 112:

( f * g ) = ( ( f * g ) ( t ) | t = ( + 1 , + 1 ) to ( + 3 , + 3 ) ) = ( 4 , 3 , 4 , 2 , 4 , 3 , 2 , 3 , 4 ) . Equation ( 3 ) ##EQU00001##

Example Three-Dimensional Convolutional Layer

[0056] FIG. 2 schematically illustrates an example three-dimensional convolutional layer 200 of a convolutional neural network. The convolutional layer 200 can have M input channels 204 for receiving M input activation maps 204a1, 204b1, … , and 204m1. An input activation map can have an input activation map width of Q and an input activation map height of P. The input activation maps 204a1, 204b1, … , and 204m1 can have the same input activation map width Q and input activation map height P.

[0057] The convolutional layer 200 can include a kernel stack 208 of all kernels of the convolutional layer 200. The kernel stack 208 can include kernels 208a1-208an, 208b1-208bn, and 208m1-208mn. The kernel stack 208 includes M rows of kernels The kernel stack 208 includes N columns of kernels with each column also referred to as a filter bank of the kernel stack 208. For example, the column of kernels 208a1, 208b1, … , and 208m1 forms a filter bank of the kernel stack 208. A kernel of the kernel stack 208 can have a kernel width of K.sub.x weight values and a kernel height of K.sub.y weight values with a total of K.sub.y*K.sub.x weight values. The kernels 208a1-208an, 208b1-208bn, and 208m1-208mn of the kernel stack 208 can have the same kernel width K.sub.x and kernel height K.sub.y.

[0058] The convolutional layer 200 can have N output channels 212 for producing N output activation maps 212a1, 212a2, and 212an. Each output activation map can be a result of a three-dimensional convolution of a filter bank of the kernel stack 208 and the corresponding input activation maps. An output activation map can have an output activation map width of Q’ and an output activation map height of P’. The output activation maps 212a1, 212a2, … , and 212an can have the same output activation map width Q and output activation map height P.

[0059] The operations of the convolutional layer 200 can be summarized by the pseudo-codes below:

[0060] (1) For a variable n from the value 1 to the value N:

[0061] (2a) Set pixel values of an nth output activation map to values of zero.

[0062] (2b) For a variable m from the value of 1 to the value of M:

[0063] (3a) Pixel values of the nth output activation map+= [0064] Convolve (an nth input activation map, a kernel at position (m, n) of the kernel stack), where “Convolve” denotes a two-dimensional convolution and “+=” represents a pointwise summation of an output activation map with a result of a convolution of an input activation map with a kernel.

[0065] End of (2b).

[0066] End of (1).

Example Utilization of Single Instruction,* Multiple Data Register*

[0067] Systems and methods disclosed herein can enable efficient implementations of CNNs, on computing devices such as a computer server, a personal computer, a tablet computer, a mobile device, or an embedded device. A computing device can include a vector processor, a Very Long Instruction Word (VLIW) vector processor, or a Single Instruction, Multiple Data (SIMD) processor. A SIMD-capable processor or architecture can be an Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) or a specific hardware implementation of that ISA, capable of performing data parallel computations through the use of “single instruction, multiple data” operations, where a single instruction can be carried through in parallel to perform the same operation on multiple, disjoint set of input data. Non-limiting examples of such ISA include streaming SIMD extensions (SSE) family of extensions on x86, the NEON or advanced SIMD extension on Advanced RISC Machine (ARM), AltiVec on PowerPC, etc. Accordingly, efficient implementations of CNNs can improve utilization, such as maximum utilization of processors, including utilization of the memory and the Single Instruction, Multiple Data (SIMD) execution units on processors implementing SIMD-capable architectures.

[0068] In some implementations, desirable features for a kernel can include equi-distance around the center of the kernel. A kernel with a dimension that is an odd integer (e.g., a 3.times.1 kernel) can have such a desirable feature. However, the odd integer dimension of such a kernel may not be divisible by 2. And SIMD processor registers may have a register width that is a power of 2 (and hence even). Naive implementations of a convolution may not achieve full utilization of the SIMD execution unit of a SIMD-capable processor without one or both of data duplication or by bundling convolutions together. For example, the “im2col” and “col2im” transformations can be used for data duplication, which comes at a cost to memory utilization. Furthermore, the “im2col” and “col2im” transformations can be computationally expensive. Bundling convolutions together may require (compared to the systems and methods disclosed herein) horizontal SIMD operations, which can be extra operations that can decrease utilization of the SIMD execution unit.

[0069] FIG. 3 shows a schematic illustration of a single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) register of width four not fully utilized by convolutions of 3.times.3, 1.times.3, or 3.times.1 kernels. FIG. 3, left panel shows a 3.times.3 kernel 304a with each white square representing a weight value of the kernel 304a. A SIMD register 308a can contain four weight values of the kernel 304a. The number of weight values that the SIMD register 308a can contain depends on both the data type of the weight values and the bit width of the SIMD register 308a (e.g., 128 bits). Thus, a naive implementation of the kernel 304a fails to fully utilize the SIMD register 308a. FIG. 3, middle panel shows a 1.times.3 kernel 304b with each white square representing a weight value of the kernel 304b. A SIMD register 308b can contain four weight values of the kernel 304b. Thus, a naive implementation of the kernel 304b may not fully utilize the SIMD register 308b (as well as SIMD registers with widths other than four). FIG. 3, right panel shows a 3.times.1 kernel 304c with each white square representing a weight value of the kernel 304c. A SIMD register 308c can contain four weight values of the kernel 304c. Thus, a naive implementation of the kernel 304c fails to fully utilize the SIMD register 308c.

Example Reordering of Pixel Values of Input Action Maps of a Convolutional Layer

[0070] To improve utilization of a SIMD register without negatively or substantially negatively affecting memory utilization n, pixel values of input activation maps can be reordered. FIG. 4 schematically illustrates an example reordering 400 of pixel values of input activation maps of a convolutional layer of a convolutional neural network. Reordering pixel values of input activation maps transforms input activation maps from a basic layout for input activation maps (basic input activation map layout) to an interleaved layout for input activation maps (interleaved input activation map layout).

[0071] With the basic input activation map layout, an input activation map may be ordered channel by channel, such that all pixel values of the first input activation map, can be stored before all pixels of the second input activation map (in terms of memory location) and so on. As illustrated in FIG. 4, a convolution layer can receive four input activation maps 404, 408, 412, and 416 as its input. With the basic layout, pixels of the input activation maps 404, 408, 412, and 416 can be stored channel by channel. For example, pixel values 404a and 404b of the first input activation map 404 can be stored before pixel values 408a and 408b of the second input activation map 408. As another example, pixel values 408a and 408b of the second input activation map 408 can be stored before pixel values 412a and 412b of the third input activation map 412. As yet another example, pixel values 412a and 412b of the third input activation map 412 can be stored before pixel values 416a and 416b of the fourth input activation map 416.

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