Magic Leap Patent | Light Field Processor System

Patent: Light Field Processor System

Publication Number: 10451895

Publication Date: 20191022

Applicants: Magic Leap

Abstract

A wearable ophthalmic device is disclosed. The device may include an outward facing head-mounted light field camera to receive light from a user’s surroundings and to generate numerical light field image data. The device may also include a light field processor to access the numerical light field image data, to obtain an optical prescription for an eye of the user, and to computationally introduce an amount of positive or negative optical power to the numerical light field image data based on the optical prescription to generate modified numerical light field image data. The device may also include a head-mounted light field display to generate a physical light field corresponding to the modified numerical light field image data.

BACKGROUND

Field

This disclosure relates to various methods and systems for diagnosing, monitoring, and treating health conditions and ailments.

Related Art

Ophthalmic instruments and techniques are routinely used by clinicians to diagnose and treat eye-related ailments. An example of a traditional ophthalmic device is shown in FIG. 1. During use of the illustrated device, the patient may be positioned in a specific, seated position for the entire duration of the procedure, which typically may last anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes.

Undesirably, ophthalmic devices tend to be large, bulky and expensive devices, and are typically used exclusively in doctor’s offices. Thus, patients may be required to make an appointment with an optometrist and visit the doctor for any diagnoses or treatment to take place. This can be a deterring factor for many patients, who may delay the trip to the doctor’s office for long periods of time, possibly until a condition has worsened. The worsened condition may require even more drastic therapies or procedures to address when the condition could have been more easily alleviated had the patient been timely diagnosed or treated. Furthermore, the large and bulky nature of most ophthalmic devices forces patients to be placed in an uncomfortable position, which in turn may increase risks of misdiagnoses and patient error.

Accordingly, there is a need for health systems that address one or more of the difficulties described above.

SUMMARY

A wearable ophthalmic device is described herein. In some embodiments, the wearable ophthalmic device comprises: an outward facing head-mounted light field camera configured to receive light from a user’s surroundings and to generate numerical light field image data; a light field processor configured to access the numerical light field image data, to obtain an optical prescription for an eye of the user, and to computationally introduce an amount of positive or negative optical power to the numerical light field image data based on the optical prescription to generate modified numerical light field image data; and a head-mounted light field display configured to generate a physical light field corresponding to the modified numerical light field image data.

A method for using a wearable ophthalmic device is also disclosed. In some embodiments, the method comprises: receiving light from a user’s surroundings and generating numerical light field image data using a light field camera; accessing the numerical light field image data; obtaining an optical prescription for an eye of the user; computationally introducing an amount of positive or negative optical power to the numerical light field image data based on the optical prescription to generate modified numerical light field image data; and generating a physical light field corresponding to the modified numerical light field image data using a light field display.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The drawings illustrate some examples of embodiments disclosed herein and do not limit the invention. It should be noted that the figures are not drawn to scale and that elements of similar structures or functions are represented by like reference numerals throughout the figures.

FIG. 1 illustrates a traditional ophthalmic instrument being used at a clinician’s office.

FIG. 2 illustrates a cross-section of a human eye.

FIGS. 3A-3D illustrate various configurations of an example ophthalmic device.

FIGS. 4A-4D illustrate various eye and head measurements taken in order to configure the ophthalmic device for a particular user.

FIG. 5 shows a schematic view of various components of an ophthalmic device according to some embodiments.

FIG. 6 illustrates a light field processor system for capturing light field image data (e.g., photographs and/or video) from at least a portion of a user’s field of view and then processing the captured light field image data and displaying the processed light field image data to the user.

FIG. 7 is a schematic illustration of an embodiment of the light field processor system of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a flowchart that illustrates a method for using the light field processor system shown in FIGS. 6 and 7 to correct myopia, hyperopia, and/or astigmatism for a user.

FIGS. 9A-9B illustrate a schematic, cross-sectional view of a user’s eye suffering from myopia.

FIGS. 10A-10B illustrate a schematic, cross-sectional view of a user’s eye suffering from hyperopia.

FIGS. 11A-11B illustrate a schematic, cross-sectional view of a user’s eye suffering from astigmatism.

FIG. 12 shows an example method for using the light field processor system to correct presbyopia.

FIG. 13 illustrates an example method for using the light field processor system to treat convergence deficiencies, such as those caused by strabismus and/or amblyopia.

FIG. 14 is a schematic illustration of an embodiment of a light field processor system which includes an outward facing integral imaging camera, a light field processor, and an integral imaging display which also includes one or more photodetectors.

FIG. 15 illustrates how the wearable devices described herein can be used to function as a phoropter or refractor to determine a suitable refraction that corrects or improves the vision of a wearer or a patient.

FIG. 16 illustrates an example method for determining an optical prescription of a wearer of a light field processor system configured for use as a virtual phoropter.

FIG. 17 illustrates an example method for measuring refractive error of a wearer of a light field processor system configured as an ophthalmic device to perform retinoscopy.

FIGS. 18A-18C illustrate an example embodiment of an augmented and/or virtual reality system configured as an autorefractor.

FIG. 19 shows a method for using the systems described herein to diagnose, detect, and/or identify any areas of macular degeneration.

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